Events

Event Calendar for The Berkshires and Litchfield County

Sep
22
Wed
Lenox, MA–FREE FALL MIGRATION BIRDING PROGRAM @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, MA
Sep 22 @ 7:30 am – 9:00 am

Mass Audubon has begun it’s fall migration birding programs. Explore Pleasant Valley’s beaver ponds, wetlands, woods, and meadows which are super sites to see warblers, tanagers, orioles, and more during spring migration and nesting season.

Pre-Registration is required at www.massaudubon.org/pleasantvalleyprograms

Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 22 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
23
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 23 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

West Stockbridge, MA–Thursday Farmers Market @ Foundry Green
Sep 23 @ 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Sep
24
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–FREE FALL MIGRATION BIRDING PROGRAM @ Canoe Meadows Wildlife Sanctuary
Sep 24 @ 7:30 am – 9:00 am

Mass Audubon has begun it’s fall migration birding programs. The beautiful grounds at Canoe Meadows are ideal for spotting migrant species, especially colorful wood-warblers, orioles, and thrushes. Explore wetlands, meadows, and woodlands, while seeing different bird species each week.

Pre-Registration is required at www.massaudubon.org/pleasantvalleyprograms

Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 24 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Lenox, MA–Friday Farmers Market @ 21 Housatonic St..
Sep 24 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Sheffield, MA–Friday Farmers Market @ Old Parish Church parking lot
Sep 24 @ 3:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Sharon, CT–AMANDA LEA LAVERGNE Performance @ Sharon Playhouse
Sep 24 @ 8:00 pm

Amanda is a NY based actress who has appeared on Broadway in Annie, The People In The Picture, and Grease. Her Off-Broadway credits include This One’s For The Girls and Loveless Texas. Regionally she has starred in Crazy for You, Anything Goes, Nice Work If You Can Get It, Singin’ In The Rain, Shout!, Gypsy, All Shook Up, The Little Mermaid, Beehive, and A Chorus Line. Amanda has also toured the US with Crazy For You, Hairspray, and Disney’s High School Musical. Amanda recently made her Australian debut alongside Anthony Warlow in Jekyll and Hyde.

 

Sep
25
Sat
Lanesborough, MA–Sat Farmers Market @ Berkshire Mall parking lot
Sep 25 @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm
Great Barrington, MA–Saturday Farmers Market @ 18 Church St.
Sep 25 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Lee, MA–Birding at Basin Pond with Berkshire Natural Resources Council @ Basin Pond
Sep 25 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am

Please RSVP to Noah at noah@thebeatnews.org.
(Up to 6 participants)
Difficulty: Moderate (easy pace, moderate elevation change)

Join BNRC and BEAT on a moderate walk along the Basin Pond trails. Noah, Stewardship Manager with the Berkshire Environmental Action Team, will guide the group in learning about bird song, behavior, and habitat.
We’ll also discuss some favorite field guides and apps! Please be aware that birding walks are slower paced than a hike. Wear sturdy footwear, bring water, a snack and binoculars if you have them. We will have a few to distribute for the walk.
The outlined safety protocols must be followed.

Directions to Basin Pond Trailhead, Lee:
From Lee: Take Route 20 east past the Outlets. After approximately 4 miles turn left onto Becket Road. Parking will be on your left after a third of a mile.

From Great Barrington: Take Route 7 north into Stockbridge. Turn onto Route 102 heading east into Lee. After passing Big Y, turn right onto Route 20 heading east. After approximately 4 miles turn left onto Becket Road. Parking will be on your left after a third of a mile.

From Pittsfield: Take Route 20 south into Lee. From Lee, stay on Route 20 heading east, past the Mass Pike toward Becket. After approximately 4 miles turn left onto Becket Road. Parking will be on your left after a third of a mile.

Email Mariah at mauman@bnrc.org or Noah at noah@thebeatnews.org with any questions.

 

Lee/Becket, MA–Birding at Basin Pond Preserve (RSVP Required), with Berkshire Natural Resources Council
Sep 25 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am

Please RSVP to Noah at noah@thebeatnews.org.
(Up to 6 participants)
Difficulty: Moderate (easy pace, moderate elevation change)

Description: Join BNRC and BEAT on a moderate walk along the Basin Pond trails. Noah, Stewardship Manager with the Berkshire Environmental Action Team, will guide the group in learning about bird song, behavior, and habitat. We’ll also discuss some favorite field guides and apps! Please be aware that birding walks are slower paced than a hike. Wear sturdy footwear, bring water, a snack and binoculars if you have them. We will have a few to distribute for the walk. The outlined safety protocols must be followed.

Directions to Basin Pond Trailhead, Lee:
From Lee: Take Route 20 east past the Outlets. After approximately 4 miles turn left onto Becket Road. Parking will be on your left after a third of a mile.

From Great Barrington: Take Route 7 north into Stockbridge. Turn onto Route 102 heading east into Lee. After passing Big Y, turn right onto Route 20 heading east. After approximately 4 miles turn left onto Becket Road. Parking will be on your left after a third of a mile.

From Pittsfield: Take Route 20 south into Lee. From Lee, stay on Route 20 heading east, past the Mass Turnpike, toward Becket. After 4 miles, turn left onto Becket Road and drive 1/3 mile to parking area on left.

Pittsfield, MA–Saturday Farmers Market @ The Commond Park
Sep 25 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Cornwall, CT–Saturday Farmers Market @ Wish House Lawn
Sep 25 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm

featuring the following Vendors and Products :
*Carol Bonci aka Cafe Lally , savory baked goods + an introduction to Love Feast by Komini , vegetarian India prepared foods & Hosta Hill fermented foods
Margaret Tully , flowers , plants & Maple Syrup
Chapel of All Saints , jams , jellies and other preserves + surprises 
Caroline Rodriguez vegetables 
Crooked Oak Farm , vegetables
Happy Poultry Farm , Jorie and Wendy Welshan’s chickens will be doing their best to keep you supplied with eggs
RD Farm , beef , pork , vegetables , eggs , maple syrup and more ……
*Miracle Spring Farm , goat cheeses
*Cornwall Country Market Bakery cakes , breads , pies , croissants , danishes, muffins , scones ,cookies and more 
Coffee-Tea-Etc.
Bantam Bread

Lee, MA–Saturday Farmers Market @ Lee Town Park
Sep 25 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 25 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
26
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 26 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
27
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 27 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
28
Tue
Lenox, MA–FREE FALL MIGRATION BIRDING PROGRAM @ The Mount, Edith Warton's Home
Sep 28 @ 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Explore Edith Wharton’s original estate, including its woods, wetlands, and meadows. Learn skills to bird by sight and sound as we look for numerous bird species, including bobolinks, woodpeckers, vireos, and warblers. Walks depart from the main parking lot.
For the safety and enjoyment of all, advanced registration is required. Walk-ins cannot be accommodated. Dates will likely be fully booked, with waiting lists so book now!

Pre-Registration is required at www.massaudubon.org/pleasantvalleyprograms

==

Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 28 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
29
Wed
Lenox, MA–FREE FALL MIGRATION BIRDING PROGRAM @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, MA
Sep 29 @ 7:30 am – 9:00 am

Mass Audubon has begun it’s fall migration birding programs. Explore Pleasant Valley’s beaver ponds, wetlands, woods, and meadows which are super sites to see warblers, tanagers, orioles, and more during spring migration and nesting season.

Pre-Registration is required at www.massaudubon.org/pleasantvalleyprograms

Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 29 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
30
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 30 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

West Stockbridge, MA–Thursday Farmers Market @ Foundry Green
Sep 30 @ 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Oct
1
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–FREE FALL MIGRATION BIRDING PROGRAM @ Canoe Meadows Wildlife Sanctuary
Oct 1 @ 7:30 am – 9:00 am

Mass Audubon has begun it’s fall migration birding programs. The beautiful grounds at Canoe Meadows are ideal for spotting migrant species, especially colorful wood-warblers, orioles, and thrushes. Explore wetlands, meadows, and woodlands, while seeing different bird species each week.

Pre-Registration is required at www.massaudubon.org/pleasantvalleyprograms

Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 1 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Lenox, MA–Friday Farmers Market @ 21 Housatonic St..
Oct 1 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Sheffield, MA–Friday Farmers Market @ Old Parish Church parking lot
Oct 1 @ 3:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Oct
2
Sat
Lanesborough, MA–Sat Farmers Market @ Berkshire Mall parking lot
Oct 2 @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm
Great Barrington, MA–Saturday Farmers Market @ 18 Church St.
Oct 2 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Pittsfield, MA–Saturday Farmers Market @ The Commond Park
Oct 2 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Cornwall, CT–Saturday Farmers Market @ Wish House Lawn
Oct 2 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm

featuring the following Vendors and Products :
*Carol Bonci aka Cafe Lally , savory baked goods + an introduction to Love Feast by Komini , vegetarian India prepared foods & Hosta Hill fermented foods
Margaret Tully , flowers , plants & Maple Syrup
Chapel of All Saints , jams , jellies and other preserves + surprises 
Caroline Rodriguez vegetables 
Crooked Oak Farm , vegetables
Happy Poultry Farm , Jorie and Wendy Welshan’s chickens will be doing their best to keep you supplied with eggs
RD Farm , beef , pork , vegetables , eggs , maple syrup and more ……
*Miracle Spring Farm , goat cheeses
*Cornwall Country Market Bakery cakes , breads , pies , croissants , danishes, muffins , scones ,cookies and more 
Coffee-Tea-Etc.
Bantam Bread

Lee, MA–Saturday Farmers Market @ Lee Town Park
Oct 2 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 2 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

New Milford RiverFest @ YOUNG'S FIELD ROAD, NEW MILFORD, CT
Oct 2 @ 11:00 am – 9:30 pm
New Milford, CT–RiverFest
Oct 2 @ 11:00 am – 9:30 pm

Throughout New Milford’s history the Housatonic River and its waterfront have played a key role in residents’ lives.

Revitalizing the riverfront is the ambitious goal of a long-term plan to enhance our quality of life and the town’s economic vitality.

RiverFest, organized by the town’s Riverfront  Revitalization Committee and the Mayor’s office, highlights our riverfront area and its connections to Downtown.

RiverFest is a celebration of community and a time to gather with friends and family.  Taking place along the banks of Housatonic River in New Milford, CT – gateway to Litchfield County –and our historic Downtown Village Center, with its popular restaurants and diverse retail offerings, it will highlight the heart of our community. Together Downtown and the Riverfront are envisioned as a vibrant hub of commerce, recreation, entertainment and residential life by the Riverfront Revitalization Committee, organizers of this exciting event. 

Admission is free.  Attractions include:

  • Live music and entertainment

  • Food trucks and local food vendors

  • Beer and Wine Garden

  • Arts and crafts vendors

  • Environmental education

  • Children’s activities

  • Guided walks along the envisioned One-Mile “Down to the River” walk

Oct
3
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 3 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

New Milford RiverFest @ YOUNG'S FIELD ROAD, NEW MILFORD, CT
Oct 3 @ 11:00 am – 9:30 pm
New Milford, CT–RiverFest
Oct 3 @ 11:00 am – 9:30 pm

Throughout New Milford’s history the Housatonic River and its waterfront have played a key role in residents’ lives.

Revitalizing the riverfront is the ambitious goal of a long-term plan to enhance our quality of life and the town’s economic vitality.

RiverFest, organized by the town’s Riverfront  Revitalization Committee and the Mayor’s office, highlights our riverfront area and its connections to Downtown.

RiverFest is a celebration of community and a time to gather with friends and family.  Taking place along the banks of Housatonic River in New Milford, CT – gateway to Litchfield County –and our historic Downtown Village Center, with its popular restaurants and diverse retail offerings, it will highlight the heart of our community. Together Downtown and the Riverfront are envisioned as a vibrant hub of commerce, recreation, entertainment and residential life by the Riverfront Revitalization Committee, organizers of this exciting event. 

Admission is free.  Attractions include:

  • Live music and entertainment

  • Food trucks and local food vendors

  • Beer and Wine Garden

  • Arts and crafts vendors

  • Environmental education

  • Children’s activities

  • Guided walks along the envisioned One-Mile “Down to the River” walk

Oct
4
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 4 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
5
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 5 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
6
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 6 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
7
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 7 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

West Stockbridge, MA–Thursday Farmers Market @ Foundry Green
Oct 7 @ 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Oct
8
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 8 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sheffield, MA–Friday Farmers Market @ Old Parish Church parking lot
Oct 8 @ 3:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Oct
9
Sat
Lanesborough, MA–Sat Farmers Market @ Berkshire Mall parking lot
Oct 9 @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm
Great Barrington, MA–Saturday Farmers Market @ 18 Church St.
Oct 9 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Pittsfield, MA–Saturday Farmers Market @ The Commond Park
Oct 9 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Cornwall, CT–Saturday Farmers Market @ Wish House Lawn
Oct 9 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm

featuring the following Vendors and Products :
*Carol Bonci aka Cafe Lally , savory baked goods + an introduction to Love Feast by Komini , vegetarian India prepared foods & Hosta Hill fermented foods
Margaret Tully , flowers , plants & Maple Syrup
Chapel of All Saints , jams , jellies and other preserves + surprises 
Caroline Rodriguez vegetables 
Crooked Oak Farm , vegetables
Happy Poultry Farm , Jorie and Wendy Welshan’s chickens will be doing their best to keep you supplied with eggs
RD Farm , beef , pork , vegetables , eggs , maple syrup and more ……
*Miracle Spring Farm , goat cheeses
*Cornwall Country Market Bakery cakes , breads , pies , croissants , danishes, muffins , scones ,cookies and more 
Coffee-Tea-Etc.
Bantam Bread

Lee, MA–Saturday Farmers Market @ Lee Town Park
Oct 9 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
Norfolk, CT–Annual “Tour de Forest” Bike Ride @ Great Mountain Forest @ Great Mountain Forest
Oct 9 @ 10:00 am

Please join us to bike historic Norfolk to support the Norfolk Rails 2 Trails!

This 13-mile route is a fun recreational ride on a mix of dirt and paved roads. Enjoy views of lakes, meadows, and historic homes before heading into the majestic Great Mountain Forest. Take a break at any—or all—of the 8 info stops along the route loaded with fun facts about the forest and local railroad history.

All ages are welcome! Join in solo, with friends, or plan a family ride – children under 12 are free. Registration begins at 8:30am; Start riding at 10am on Saturday 10/9.
REGISTER: http://www.bikereg.com/norfolk-ct-tour-de-forest

Tickets are $40 for Adults; $20/for Teens. Children 12 and under are Free.      Phone: 860-384-1214

Register on-line or day of the event at 70 Golf Drive, Norfolk, CT 06058

Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 9 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
10
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 10 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Portraits of American Trees – gallery talks led by Tom Zetterstrom @ Berkshire Botanical Garden
Oct 10 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Since the 1970’s Tom Zetterstrom has photographed trees throughout the Northeast and from coast to coast. Learn more about seeing trees in black and white, and the art of tree photography.

Oct
11
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 11 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
12
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 12 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
13
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 13 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
14
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 14 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
15
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 15 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
16
Sat
Lanesborough, MA–Sat Farmers Market @ Berkshire Mall parking lot
Oct 16 @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm
Great Barrington, MA–Saturday Farmers Market @ 18 Church St.
Oct 16 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Cornwall, CT–Saturday Farmers Market @ Wish House Lawn
Oct 16 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm

featuring the following Vendors and Products :
*Carol Bonci aka Cafe Lally , savory baked goods + an introduction to Love Feast by Komini , vegetarian India prepared foods & Hosta Hill fermented foods
Margaret Tully , flowers , plants & Maple Syrup
Chapel of All Saints , jams , jellies and other preserves + surprises 
Caroline Rodriguez vegetables 
Crooked Oak Farm , vegetables
Happy Poultry Farm , Jorie and Wendy Welshan’s chickens will be doing their best to keep you supplied with eggs
RD Farm , beef , pork , vegetables , eggs , maple syrup and more ……
*Miracle Spring Farm , goat cheeses
*Cornwall Country Market Bakery cakes , breads , pies , croissants , danishes, muffins , scones ,cookies and more 
Coffee-Tea-Etc.
Bantam Bread

Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 16 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
17
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 17 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
18
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 18 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
19
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 19 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
20
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 20 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
21
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 21 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
22
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 22 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Virtual Lecture–Mohican Experiences with Museum Repatriation Today, with Bonney Hartley, Historic Preservation Manager for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community
Oct 22 @ 7:00 pm

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) offers certain criteria for the return of Tribal Nations’ ancestral remains and cultural heirlooms. After 30 years of this law, there are still staggering numbers of human remains that have not been returned. There are also often discrepancies between how Tribes and Museums determine if the NAGPRA categories apply to items in museum collections.

Bonney Hartley, NAGPRA representative for Stockbridge-Munsee Community, the Tribal Nation indigenous to the Berkshires, will share insights from the community’s recent experiences with repatriation efforts in the region and highlight the ways that museums have increasingly shifted their understandings of Tribal stewardship.

Oct
23
Sat
Lanesborough, MA–Sat Farmers Market @ Berkshire Mall parking lot
Oct 23 @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm
Great Barrington, MA–Saturday Farmers Market @ 18 Church St.
Oct 23 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 23 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
24
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 24 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Portraits of American Trees – gallery talks led by Tom Zetterstrom @ Berkshire Botanical Garden
Oct 24 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Since the 1970’s Tom Zetterstrom has photographed trees throughout the Northeast and from coast to coast. Learn more about seeing trees in black and white, and the art of tree photography.

Oct
25
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 25 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
26
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 26 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
27
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 27 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
28
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 28 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
29
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 29 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Great Barrington, MA–Crescendo Concert: featuring our Chorus, Vocal Ensemble, Period Instrument Orchestra and Soloists, and Chamber Ensemble @ Saint James Place
Oct 29 @ 7:30 pm

The series will conclude with Crescendo’s large-scale choral-instrumental concert “Music Across Borders” that was postponed from March 2020. Crescendo Chorus, soloists and period instrument orchestra will present rarely heard festive Baroque and hauntingly beautiful choral works from the Baltics and Central Europe. This program takes us beyond the borders of the countries we normally associate with great Baroque music: Italy, Germany and France, the home of beloved composers such as Bach, Handel, Vivaldi and Lully. Transcending these borders, we will embark on a musical journey discovering how the Baroque style became a trans-nation cultural phenomenon, as composers constantly forged new connections among diverse cultural centers across borders. The Baroque competitions for chorus with orchestra are by Grzegorz Gerwazy Gorczycki (‘The Polish Handel’), Johann Adam Hiller (Latvia), Johann Valentin Meder (Latvia, Poland and Russia), Kryštof Harant (Czechia), and Bohuslav Matěj Černohorský (Czechia/Austria). They will be contrasted with contemporary a cappella vocal works by Ēriks Ešenvalds of Latvia whose “Stars” is accompanied with seldom-heard tuned musical glasses, and sacred motets by Paweł Łukaszewski of Poland and Zdeněk Lukáš of Czechia.
The performers are sopranos Jennifer Tyo, Jordan Rose Lee and Sarah Fay, countertenor Augustine Mercante (Philadelphia) and bass-baritone Peter Becker (New York). The Crescendo Chorus, and period instrument orchestra with Chris Belluscio, natural trumpet (Boston), will be conducted by Crescendo’s Founding Artistic Director Christine Gevert.

===

Oct
30
Sat
Lanesborough, MA–Sat Farmers Market @ Berkshire Mall parking lot
Oct 30 @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm
Great Barrington, MA–Saturday Farmers Market @ 18 Church St.
Oct 30 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 30 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Lakeville, CT–Crescendo Concert: featuring our Chorus, Vocal Ensemble, Period Instrument Orchestra and Soloists, and Chamber Ensemble @ Trinity Church
Oct 30 @ 7:30 pm

The series will conclude with Crescendo’s large-scale choral-instrumental concert “Music Across Borders” that was postponed from March 2020. Crescendo Chorus, soloists and period instrument orchestra will present rarely heard festive Baroque and hauntingly beautiful choral works from the Baltics and Central Europe. This program takes us beyond the borders of the countries we normally associate with great Baroque music: Italy, Germany and France, the home of beloved composers such as Bach, Handel, Vivaldi and Lully. Transcending these borders, we will embark on a musical journey discovering how the Baroque style became a trans-nation cultural phenomenon, as composers constantly forged new connections among diverse cultural centers across borders. The Baroque competitions for chorus with orchestra are by Grzegorz Gerwazy Gorczycki (‘The Polish Handel’), Johann Adam Hiller (Latvia), Johann Valentin Meder (Latvia, Poland and Russia), Kryštof Harant (Czechia), and Bohuslav Matěj Černohorský (Czechia/Austria). They will be contrasted with contemporary a cappella vocal works by Ēriks Ešenvalds of Latvia whose “Stars” is accompanied with seldom-heard tuned musical glasses, and sacred motets by Paweł Łukaszewski of Poland and Zdeněk Lukáš of Czechia.
The performers are sopranos Jennifer Tyo, Jordan Rose Lee and Sarah Fay, countertenor Augustine Mercante (Philadelphia) and bass-baritone Peter Becker (New York). The Crescendo Chorus, and period instrument orchestra with Chris Belluscio, natural trumpet (Boston), will be conducted by Crescendo’s Founding Artistic Director Christine Gevert.

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Oct
31
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 31 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
1
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 1 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
2
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 2 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
3
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 3 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
4
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 4 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
5
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 5 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
6
Sat
Lanesborough, MA–Sat Farmers Market @ Berkshire Mall parking lot
Nov 6 @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm
Great Barrington, MA–Saturday Farmers Market @ 18 Church St.
Nov 6 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 6 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
7
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 7 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
8
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 8 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
9
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 9 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
10
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 10 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.