Events

Jun
19
Tue
Lenox, MA– Birding at the Mount with Mass Audubon Staff @ The Mount, Edith Warton's Home
Jun 19 @ 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Instructor: Sanctuary Naturalist
Audience: Adult
Members & Nonmembers: Free
Explore Edith Wharton’s original estate, including woods, wetlands, and meadows. You’ll learn skills for birding by sight and song as we look for numerous bird species, including bobolinks, bald eagles, vireos, and wood warblers.

Lenox, MA–Summer Tea & Talk: Woods & Waters, Hudson River School Landscapes @ Ventfort Hall
Jun 19 @ 4:00 pm

Douglas McCombs, Chief Curator of the Albany Institute of History & Art, will canvass “Woods and Waters, Hudson River School Landscapes” from the museum’s vast collection (the largest in the Upper Hudson Valley), including works by Cole, Church, Martin and Kensett. Many of the celebrated movement’s artists lived or worked in Albany or spent time visiting friends, fellow artists and patrons. Works are shown nationwide and internationally.

Reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited.
Cost is $26.00 with an advance registration and $32.00 the day of. Member cost is $26.00. Call us at (413) 637-3206 for reservations.

Jun
20
Wed
Lanesborough/Adams, MA–Free Public Program: Summit Nature Talk and Walk (Family Fun, Nature) @ Bascom Lodge-Atop Mount Greylock
Jun 20 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Aimee Gelinas on plant identification.

THIS IS A “FREE” PUBLIC PROGRAMMING EVENT OFFERED IN COLLABORATION WITH THE UPPER HOUSATONIC VALLEY NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA.

THIS FREE EVENT IS FOLLOWED AT 7 PM, BY AN OPTIONAL PRIX FIXE DINNER MENU that CHANGES NIGHTLY. (ONE SEATING ONLY). RESERVATIONS REQUESTED.
THE KITCHEN AT BASCOM LODGE IS COMMITTED TO PROVIDING FRESH, HAND-MADE FOOD, CRAFTED FROM INGREDIENTS PURCHASED FROM LOCAL, FAMILY OWNED FARMS.

CALL: 413-743-1591, EMAIL US AT: MAIL@BASCOMLODGE.NET, OR CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR EACH EVENING’S MENU

AT AN ELEVATION OF 3,491 FEET, BASCOM LODGE AT THE SUMMIT OF MOUNT GREYLOCK DOMINATES THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE; AFFORDING PARK VISTAS OF FOUR STATES AND FIVE MOUNTAIN RANGES. LOCATED IN THE HEART OF BERKSHIRE COUNTY, THE LODGE IS A RUSTIC ARTS AND CRAFTS MOUNTAIN LODGE BUILT IN THE 1930’S BY VOLUNTEERS FROM THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS. CONSTRUCTED OF LOCAL STONE AND OLD GROWTH RED SPRUCE TIMBERS, THE LODGE WAS DESIGNED IN AN ARCHITECTURAL STYLE THAT WOULD LATER BECOME THE BLUEPRINT FOR AMERICA’S NATIONAL PARKS. NESTLED ON THE SUMMIT OF MT. GREYLOCK, THE STATE’S HIGHEST MOUNTAIN, THE LODGE IS THE CENTERPIECE OF A 12,500 ACRE WILDERNESS PARK.

FROM RT 7, DRIVE TO LANESBOROUGH AND WATCH FOR THE MOUNT GREYLOCK RESERVATION AND VISITOR CENTER SIGNS (2 MILES NORTH OF LANESBORO TOWN LINE). TURN ONTO NORTH MAIN STREET, THEN BEAR RIGHT ONTO QUARRY ROAD, THEN BEAR LEFT ONTO ROCKWELL ROAD AND FOLLOW MOUNT GREYLOCK/BASCOM LODGE SIGNS FOR 9 MILES THROUGH THE FOREST TO THE SUMMIT.

413-743-1591, www.bascomlodge.net

Dalton, MA–Presentation: “Why Here? The Rise of Berkshire County’s Industrial Might” @ Dalton Free Public Library
Jun 20 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

John Dickson, local historian and author of Berkshire County’s Industrial Heritage will present “Why Here? The Rise of Berkshire County’s Industrial Might”.

Through historic photos of the 19th century mills and factories, the story of enterprising young people harnessing the power of water to make a living for their families is revealed.

Support provided by the Central Berkshire Fund of the Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation. For more information, contact HVA at 413-298-7024 or email adixon@hvatoday.org.

Jun
23
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jun 23 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Stockbridge, MA–ART WORKSHOPS: The Art of Portraiture @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Jun 23 @ 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

Portraits are both a record of a sitter’s likeness, and ideally, they also convey a vivid sense of a person’s presence. Accomplished illustrator/painter Dan Howe has studied the techniques of the masters, and will share the essentials of effective portraiture, from capturing facial structure and expression to the subtleties of light, shadow, hue, and skin tone. A supply list will be provided, all levels are welcome. $40, $30 members.
Register for programs and classes: call 413-931-2221 or email register@nrm.org

 

Stockbridge, MA–Explore the culinary treasures hidden in local wild foods @ Berkshire Botanical Garden
Jun 23 @ 11:00 am – 2:00 pm

Phone: 413.298.3926
$45 members–$55 for non-members

Learn to identify, harvest, and prepare these ancient foods so you can easily incorporate them into your daily meals. Using basic sensory skills, we will survey the wild plants and herbs of the Berkshire Botanical Garden. Inside we will prep and taste a few of the delicious, nutrient-dense recipes from the instructor’s book Foraging & Feasting: A Field Guide and Wild Food Cookbook. Signed copies of Foraging & Feasting will be available at this presentation.

Dina Falconi is a clinical herbalist with a strong focus on food activism and nutritional healing. An avid gardener, wildcrafter, and permaculturist, Dina has been teaching classes about the use of herbs for food, medicine, and personal care, including wild food foraging and cooking, for more than twenty years. She created Falcon Formulations natural body care products and Earthly Extracts medicinal tinctures. She is a founding member of the Northeast Herbal Association, a chapter leader of the Weston A. Price Foundation, and an organizer of Slow Food-Hudson Valley. She is the author of Earthly Bodies & Heavenly Hair: Natural and Healthy Personal Care for Everybody and Foraging & Feasting: A Field Guide and Wild Food Cookbook (available at: www.botanicalartspress.com).

Advance registration is highly recommended, but walk-ins are always welcome, space permitting.

Withdrawals: To withdraw your registration from a class, please contact us as soon as possible so we can make your space available to others. If you give us at least 7 days’ notice prior to the event, we will refund you, less an administrative fee equaling 25% of the program cost. Please note: we cannot offer refunds for withdrawals less than 7 days before a class.

Jun
24
Sun
Lanesborough/Adams, MA–Free Public Program: Adventures in Historic Preservation (History Presentation/Talk) @ Bascom Lodge-Atop Mount Greylock
Jun 24 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

William Hosley narrates the battles to save pieces of history.

THIS IS A “FREE” PUBLIC PROGRAMMING EVENT OFFERED IN COLLABORATION WITH THE UPPER HOUSATONIC VALLEY NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA.

THIS FREE EVENT IS FOLLOWED AT 7 PM, BY AN OPTIONAL PRIX FIXE DINNER MENU that CHANGES NIGHTLY. (ONE SEATING ONLY). RESERVATIONS REQUESTED.
THE KITCHEN AT BASCOM LODGE IS COMMITTED TO PROVIDING FRESH, HAND-MADE FOOD, CRAFTED FROM INGREDIENTS PURCHASED FROM LOCAL, FAMILY OWNED FARMS.

CALL: 413-743-1591, EMAIL US AT: MAIL@BASCOMLODGE.NET, OR CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR EACH EVENING’S MENU

AT AN ELEVATION OF 3,491 FEET, BASCOM LODGE AT THE SUMMIT OF MOUNT GREYLOCK DOMINATES THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE; AFFORDING PARK VISTAS OF FOUR STATES AND FIVE MOUNTAIN RANGES. LOCATED IN THE HEART OF BERKSHIRE COUNTY, THE LODGE IS A RUSTIC ARTS AND CRAFTS MOUNTAIN LODGE BUILT IN THE 1930’S BY VOLUNTEERS FROM THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS. CONSTRUCTED OF LOCAL STONE AND OLD GROWTH RED SPRUCE TIMBERS, THE LODGE WAS DESIGNED IN AN ARCHITECTURAL STYLE THAT WOULD LATER BECOME THE BLUEPRINT FOR AMERICA’S NATIONAL PARKS. NESTLED ON THE SUMMIT OF MT. GREYLOCK, THE STATE’S HIGHEST MOUNTAIN, THE LODGE IS THE CENTERPIECE OF A 12,500 ACRE WILDERNESS PARK.

FROM RT 7, DRIVE TO LANESBOROUGH AND WATCH FOR THE MOUNT GREYLOCK RESERVATION AND VISITOR CENTER SIGNS (2 MILES NORTH OF LANESBORO TOWN LINE). TURN ONTO NORTH MAIN STREET, THEN BEAR RIGHT ONTO QUARRY ROAD, THEN BEAR LEFT ONTO ROCKWELL ROAD AND FOLLOW MOUNT GREYLOCK/BASCOM LODGE SIGNS FOR 9 MILES THROUGH THE FOREST TO THE SUMMIT.

413-743-1591, www.bascomlodge.net

Jun
26
Tue
Lenox, MA– Birding at the Mount with Mass Audubon Staff @ The Mount, Edith Warton's Home
Jun 26 @ 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Instructor: Sanctuary Naturalist
Audience: Adult
Members & Nonmembers: Free
Explore Edith Wharton’s original estate, including woods, wetlands, and meadows. You’ll learn skills for birding by sight and song as we look for numerous bird species, including bobolinks, bald eagles, vireos, and wood warblers.

Lenox, MA–Summer Tea & Talk: The Girl on the Velvet Swing @ Ventfort Hall
Jun 26 @ 4:00 pm

Sex, Murder and Madness at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century is the subtitle for legal historian Simon Baatz’s new book The Girl on the Velvet Swing. She was just 16, a chorus girl in the musical Florodora, and he was 47, the foremost architect of his day, when she dined with him at his home in New York. Losing consciousness after too much champagne, Evelyn Nesbit awoke in bed with Stanford White. Later, she was to confide in Harry Thaw.

Reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited.
Cost is $26.00 with an advance registration and $32.00 the day of. Member cost is $26.00. Call us at (413) 637-3206 for reservations.

 

Jun
27
Wed
Lanesborough/Adams, MA–Free Public Program: Trout and Climate Change (Nature Talk) @ Bascom Lodge-Atop Mount Greylock
Jun 27 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Lauren Stevens articulates the dangers cold water fish face from climate change.

THIS IS A “FREE” PUBLIC PROGRAMMING EVENT OFFERED IN COLLABORATION WITH THE UPPER HOUSATONIC VALLEY NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA.

THIS FREE EVENT IS FOLLOWED AT 7 PM, BY AN OPTIONAL PRIX FIXE DINNER MENU that CHANGES NIGHTLY. (ONE SEATING ONLY). RESERVATIONS REQUESTED.
THE KITCHEN AT BASCOM LODGE IS COMMITTED TO PROVIDING FRESH, HAND-MADE FOOD, CRAFTED FROM INGREDIENTS PURCHASED FROM LOCAL, FAMILY OWNED FARMS.

CALL: 413-743-1591, EMAIL US AT: MAIL@BASCOMLODGE.NET, OR CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR EACH EVENING’S MENU

AT AN ELEVATION OF 3,491 FEET, BASCOM LODGE AT THE SUMMIT OF MOUNT GREYLOCK DOMINATES THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE; AFFORDING PARK VISTAS OF FOUR STATES AND FIVE MOUNTAIN RANGES. LOCATED IN THE HEART OF BERKSHIRE COUNTY, THE LODGE IS A RUSTIC ARTS AND CRAFTS MOUNTAIN LODGE BUILT IN THE 1930’S BY VOLUNTEERS FROM THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS. CONSTRUCTED OF LOCAL STONE AND OLD GROWTH RED SPRUCE TIMBERS, THE LODGE WAS DESIGNED IN AN ARCHITECTURAL STYLE THAT WOULD LATER BECOME THE BLUEPRINT FOR AMERICA’S NATIONAL PARKS. NESTLED ON THE SUMMIT OF MT. GREYLOCK, THE STATE’S HIGHEST MOUNTAIN, THE LODGE IS THE CENTERPIECE OF A 12,500 ACRE WILDERNESS PARK.

FROM RT 7, DRIVE TO LANESBOROUGH AND WATCH FOR THE MOUNT GREYLOCK RESERVATION AND VISITOR CENTER SIGNS (2 MILES NORTH OF LANESBORO TOWN LINE). TURN ONTO NORTH MAIN STREET, THEN BEAR RIGHT ONTO QUARRY ROAD, THEN BEAR LEFT ONTO ROCKWELL ROAD AND FOLLOW MOUNT GREYLOCK/BASCOM LODGE SIGNS FOR 9 MILES THROUGH THE FOREST TO THE SUMMIT.

413-743-1591, www.bascomlodge.net

Lenox, MA–Evening at the Beaver Ponds @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jun 27 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 3 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $6.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $4.00
Enjoy an evening searching for beavers and other wildlife that frequent our wildlife sanctuary ponds. Learn about the lives of beavers, their amazing recovery story, and how they continue to shape the landscape more than 80 years after their reintroduction to the area.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jun
29
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–Firefly Watch with Audubon staff @ Canoe Meadows Wildlife Sanctuary
Jun 29 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm

Instructor: Dale Abrams – Education Coordinator
Audience: All (suitable for children 0 – 18 years)
Members & Nonmembers: Free
Experience a magical summer light show, and help us track firefly numbers and diversity through the Firefly Watch program. Learn about fireflies and how best to view or gently catch (and release) these mystical glowing lights of summer! We’ll take an evening walk in the meadows for firefly viewing, and also keep our eyes open for stars, planets, and twilight birds and mammals!
Suggested contribution $4/person or $10/family
Directions to the meeting place will be provided upon registration.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jun
30
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jun 30 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Pittsfield, MA–Library in the Wilderness Workshop with Berkshire Natural Resources Council Staff @ Berkshire Athenaeum, Pittsfield’s Public Library
Jun 30 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Saturday, June 30, 2018, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Learn about local flora and fauna and find out how to check out a backpack fully equipped for an outdoor adventure.

Email Mariah at mauman@bnrc.org or call 413-499-0596 with any questions.

Tyringham, MA–Bidwell House Museum History Talk: The Sun Ever Shines on Them–The Global Reach of William and Jemima Bidwell Partridge’s Family @ Tyringham Union Church
Jun 30 @ 10:00 am

A talk by Bidwell descendant, Russ Taylor. William Partridge’s brother, Dr. Oliver Partridge of Stockbridge, marveled that, with the exception of 40 minutes each day, the sun shone somewhere on a member of William and Jemima’s family. From missions in the Middle East and the Sandwich Islands to the establishment of religious communities in the Midwest, the impact of some of Rev. Adonijah’s grandchildren has been vast … and enduring.
Members: $10. Non-members: $15.

Jul
1
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 1 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Jul
3
Tue
Lenox, MA–Birding at the Mount with Mass Audubon @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Jul 3 @ 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Audience: Adult Members & Nonmembers: Free
Explore Edith Wharton’s original estate, including woods, wetlands, and meadows. You’ll learn skills for birding by sight and song as we look for numerous bird species, including bobolinks, bald eagles, vireos, and wood warblers.

For more details and registration (optional) call (413) 551-5111

Jul
5
Thu
Stockbridge, MA–CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP: Draw In! Sketching Our World @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Jul 5 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

For children ages 7 and up

Use drawing as a tool for discovery in these hands-on series of fun classes that will explore both the outdoors and the works on view, using pencil, pastel, and other dry media. $7 children, $5 members.

 

Stockbridge, MA–Historic Property Walks @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Jul 5 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Enjoy these guided strolls on the Museum’s bucolic 36-acre site and learn about the historic buildings on its property, including Linwood House, an 1859 Berkshire Cottage, and Norman Rockwell’s own Stockbridge Studio. We’ll also explore the sculptural installations of Peter Rockwell, a noted stone carver and historian, and the artist’s youngest son.

Free for Museum members, or included with Museum admission.

==

Lenox, MA–Summer Tea & Talk: Louisa May Alcott & Concord’s Literary Luminaries @ Ventfort Hall
Jul 5 @ 4:00 pm

As follow-up to the Little Women series on PBS, historian Julie Agar will focus on its author with “Louisa May Alcott and Concord’s Literary Luminaries.” Her father was Bronson Alcott, an unsuccessful educator and philosopher (she portrayed him as a “man up in a balloon”). However, a rich intellectual life developed when his friends became his daughters’ friends and tutors, including Henry Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller.

Reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited.
Cost is $26.00 with an advance registration and $32.00 the day of. Member cost is $26.00. Call us at (413) 637-3206 for reservations.

Stockbridge, MA–Rooted in Tradition: Parrish, Wyeth, and Rockwell @ NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM
Jul 5 @ 5:30 pm

Enjoy this fascinating talk by Dennis Nolan, curator of Keepers of the Flame, who will discuss the art of popular Golden Age illustrators and their roots, which reach back to fifteenth century Europe.

Free for Museum members, or included with Museum admission.

 

Lenox, MA– Evening Paddle on the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 5 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Evening is the perfect time to look for wildlife. We’ll leisurely explore the rich wetlands of the Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in the hours before dusk, find a cove to come together and enjoy refreshments while we listen and watch for wildlife. Kingfishers, herons, muskrats, beavers, and other wildlife are all possible sightings.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
6
Fri
Lenox, MA–Growing Beautiful Native Gardens with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 6 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Instructor: Liz Stell – Sanctuary Volunteer
Audience: Adult Members: $6.00 Nonmembers: $8.00
Explore the new gardens at Pleasant Valley, where a mix of flowers, ferns, and shrubs provide essential food and shelter for native insects and birds. Avid gardener Liz Stell will share her experience with native plants that grow well in home landscapes. She’ll help you choose plants well-suited to your site and share tips about the best nurseries for native plants.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Lenox, MA–Firefly Watch with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 6 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 0 – 18 years)
Members & Nonmembers: Free
Experience a magical summer light show, and help us track firefly numbers and diversity through the Firefly Watch program. Learn about fireflies and how best to view or gently catch (and release) these mystical glowing lights of summer! We’ll take an evening walk in the meadows for firefly viewing, and also keep our eyes open for stars, planets, and twilight birds and mammals!
Suggested contribution $4/person or $10/family
Directions to the meeting place will be provided upon registration.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
7
Sat
Lenox, MA–Canoeing the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 7 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.
This leisurely paddle will take us through the ecologically rich Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in Lenox. We’ll watch for swallows, herons, kingfishers, muskrats, and signs of beavers along the scenic and meandering Housatonic River and learn about why the waterway is the natural heart of the Berkshires.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 7 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Lenox, MA– Pleasant Valley Wildlife Ramble with Mass Audubon Staff @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 7 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 0 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $5.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $6.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.

Explore the lower trails at Pleasant Valley with an experienced guide. We’ll search for evidence of (and hopefully see!) many wild birds and mammals as we hike along the rich pond and stream ecosystems that form the heart of the sanctuary. Along the way we’ll also learn about plant communities and the dynamic history of Pleasant Valley.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
8
Sun
Lenox, MA–Canoeing the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 8 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.
This leisurely paddle will take us through the ecologically rich Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in Lenox. We’ll watch for swallows, herons, kingfishers, muskrats, and signs of beavers along the scenic and meandering Housatonic River and learn about why the waterway is the natural heart of the Berkshires.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Jul
10
Tue
Lenox, MA–Birding at the Mount with Mass Audubon @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Jul 10 @ 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Audience: Adult Members & Nonmembers: Free
Explore Edith Wharton’s original estate, including woods, wetlands, and meadows. You’ll learn skills for birding by sight and song as we look for numerous bird species, including bobolinks, bald eagles, vireos, and wood warblers.

For more details and registration (optional) call (413) 551-5111

Lenox, MA–Summer Tea & Talk: US Tennis Association: Raising the Game @ Ventfort Hall
Jul 10 @ 4:00 pm

“…I went over to see what Mrs. Bailey had done. To my surprise, I found her out playing tennis.” Martha Summerhayes, October 1874. A singular event that portrays the early days of a great American sport. Historian Warren Kimball bases his talk on his new book The United States Tennis Association: Raising the Game. With access to private records, he tells us how the USTA was key to organizing the Grand Slam competition and the prestigious U.S. Open, among other facts.

Reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited.
Cost is $26.00 with an advance registration and $32.00 the day of. Member cost is $26.00. Call us at (413) 637-3206 for reservations.

Jul
11
Wed
Gt. Barrington, MA–W.E.B. Du Bois: Born by a Golden River–Celebrating Du Bois’s 150th birthday @ W.E.B. Du Bois River Park
Jul 11 @ 2:00 pm

W. E. B. Du Bois’s special connection to rivers offers a unique lens through which to view his more well-known accomplishments. Du Bois’s publication of Langston Hughes’s The Negro Speaks of Rivers, his 1930 speech on the Housatonic River, and his activism surrounding the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927—all speak to his lifelong dedication to environmental justice and to rivers everywhere.

Organizations throughout Berkshire County will honor this Great Barrington native with readings and musical offerings. These include a musical interpretation by MaryNell Morgan-Brown of the “Sorrow Songs” from Du Bois’s classic work, The Souls of Black Folk, and a “musical libation” introduced by jazz specialist James Browne and performed by Ghanian Master Drummer Kwaku Kwaakye Obeng and American Saxophonist Antoine Roney, in tribute to Du Bois’s African and American duality.

The event will be held on the anniversary of the first Niagara Movement Conference in 1905. It will be followed by a walking tour of sites in Great Barrington that helped to shape the town’s iconic native son, including Du Bois’s Birth Site, First Congregational Church, and the Warren Davis Home. The walk will conclude at the former Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church, 9 Elm Court, with a reception and refreshments. In the event of rain, the program will be held at First Congregational Church on Main Street.

Du Bois: Born by a Golden River will be held on the anniversary of the first Niagara Movement Conference in 1905 and will take place at the Housatonic River Walk’s W. E. B. Du Bois River Park at Church and River Streets, Great Barrington. The Great Barrington native often wrote that he was “born by a golden river,” referring to this spot. The Great Barrington Land Conservancy dedicated the place as a park in 2002 to honor his love of the Housatonic River and his campaign for the restoration of rivers around the world. The park is a site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail.

RSVP or write for details: river@gbriverwalk.org

Sponsors: Great Barrington Land Conservancy, Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail, Great Barrington Historical Society, W.E.B. Du Bois National Historic Site, Housatonic Heritage, Berkshire NAACP, UMass Amherst Public History Program, Clinton Church Restoration

Lenox, MA–Evening at the Beaver Ponds with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 11 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 3 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $6.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $4.00

Enjoy an evening searching for beavers and other wildlife that frequent our wildlife sanctuary ponds. Learn about the lives of beavers, their amazing recovery story, and how they continue to shape the landscape more than 80 years after their reintroduction to the area.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
12
Thu
Stockbridge, MA–CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP: Draw In! Sketching Our World @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Jul 12 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

For children ages 7 and up

Use drawing as a tool for discovery in these hands-on series of fun classes that will explore both the outdoors and the works on view, using pencil, pastel, and other dry media. $7 children, $5 members.

 

Stockbridge, MA–Historic Property Walks @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Jul 12 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Enjoy these guided strolls on the Museum’s bucolic 36-acre site and learn about the historic buildings on its property, including Linwood House, an 1859 Berkshire Cottage, and Norman Rockwell’s own Stockbridge Studio. We’ll also explore the sculptural installations of Peter Rockwell, a noted stone carver and historian, and the artist’s youngest son.

Free for Museum members, or included with Museum admission.

==

Lenox, MA– Evening Paddle on the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 12 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Evening is the perfect time to look for wildlife. We’ll leisurely explore the rich wetlands of the Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in the hours before dusk, find a cove to come together and enjoy refreshments while we listen and watch for wildlife. Kingfishers, herons, muskrats, beavers, and other wildlife are all possible sightings.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
14
Sat
Tyringham, MA–Canoe Upper & Lower Goose Ponds with Mass Audubon @ goose pond
Jul 14 @ 8:30 am – 12:00 pm

Instructor: Sanctuary Naturalist
Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Explore the coves and marshes of one of the Berkshires’ most beautiful lakes. Paddle across Lower Goose Pond to pristine Upper Goose Pond in search of eagles, herons, and kingfishers.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 14 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Gt. Barrington, MA–Guided Tree Walk with Tom Ingersoll @ Du Bois River Garden at River Walk
Jul 14 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

Enjoy a guided exploration of the riverine forest. Join local horticulturalist Tom Ingersoll to learn about the great variety of native tree species that are an important part of River Walk’s ongoing care of the riverbank. This year we focus on River Walk’s upper section.

This event is sponsored by Great Barrington Land Conservancy in support of River Walk.  For more information or to pre-register email: info@GBland.org

Lenox, MA– Pleasant Valley Wildlife Ramble with Mass Audubon Staff @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 14 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 0 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $5.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $6.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.

Explore the lower trails at Pleasant Valley with an experienced guide. We’ll search for evidence of (and hopefully see!) many wild birds and mammals as we hike along the rich pond and stream ecosystems that form the heart of the sanctuary. Along the way we’ll also learn about plant communities and the dynamic history of Pleasant Valley.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
15
Sun
Lenox, MA–Canoeing the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 15 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.
This leisurely paddle will take us through the ecologically rich Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in Lenox. We’ll watch for swallows, herons, kingfishers, muskrats, and signs of beavers along the scenic and meandering Housatonic River and learn about why the waterway is the natural heart of the Berkshires.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Jul
17
Tue
Lenox, MA–Birding at the Mount with Mass Audubon @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Jul 17 @ 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Audience: Adult Members & Nonmembers: Free
Explore Edith Wharton’s original estate, including woods, wetlands, and meadows. You’ll learn skills for birding by sight and song as we look for numerous bird species, including bobolinks, bald eagles, vireos, and wood warblers.

For more details and registration (optional) call (413) 551-5111

Lenox, MA–Summer Tea & Talk: Ten Restaurants that Changed America @ Ventfort Hall
Jul 17 @ 4:00 pm

From Delmonico’s to Sylvia’s to Chez Panisse, a daring and original history of dining out will be savored by Yale food historian Paul Freedman’s audience. Author of Ten Restaurants That Changed America, he will make the case that the story is one of changing immigration patterns, race relations, gender and family roles, work obligations and leisure habits, as well as the restlessness with the same old thing and our capacity for reinvention and assimilation.

Reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited.
Cost is $26.00 with an advance registration and $32.00 the day of. Member cost is $26.00. Call us at (413) 637-3206 for reservations.

Jul
19
Thu
Stockbridge, MA–CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP: Draw In! Sketching Our World @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Jul 19 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

For children ages 7 and up

Use drawing as a tool for discovery in these hands-on series of fun classes that will explore both the outdoors and the works on view, using pencil, pastel, and other dry media. $7 children, $5 members.

 

Gt. Barrington, MA–River Walk: What’s all the Buzz About?
Jul 19 @ 10:30 am

River Walk Pollinator Program. Go on a treasure hunt to find precious pollinators along the Housatonic River Walk. We will seek out their homes and foods as we observe them in their local environment. Join Heather Cupo to discover a wide array of pollinators being supported by our native plants.

This program is made possible in part with a grant from Project Native, building on their 15 years of preserving numerous native habitats in the Berkshire Taconic Region and aimed at furthering awareness of the importance of native habitats.

 

Stockbridge, MA–Historic Property Walks @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Jul 19 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Enjoy these guided strolls on the Museum’s bucolic 36-acre site and learn about the historic buildings on its property, including Linwood House, an 1859 Berkshire Cottage, and Norman Rockwell’s own Stockbridge Studio. We’ll also explore the sculptural installations of Peter Rockwell, a noted stone carver and historian, and the artist’s youngest son.

Free for Museum members, or included with Museum admission.

==

Lenox, MA– Evening Paddle on the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 19 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Evening is the perfect time to look for wildlife. We’ll leisurely explore the rich wetlands of the Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in the hours before dusk, find a cove to come together and enjoy refreshments while we listen and watch for wildlife. Kingfishers, herons, muskrats, beavers, and other wildlife are all possible sightings.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
20
Fri
Lenox, MA–Evening at the Beaver Ponds with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 20 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 3 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $6.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $4.00

Enjoy an evening searching for beavers and other wildlife that frequent our wildlife sanctuary ponds. Learn about the lives of beavers, their amazing recovery story, and how they continue to shape the landscape more than 80 years after their reintroduction to the area.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
21
Sat
Lenox, MA–Canoeing the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 21 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.
This leisurely paddle will take us through the ecologically rich Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in Lenox. We’ll watch for swallows, herons, kingfishers, muskrats, and signs of beavers along the scenic and meandering Housatonic River and learn about why the waterway is the natural heart of the Berkshires.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 21 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Tyringham, MA–Bidwell House History Talk- Frenemies: Relationships between European colonists and Mohicans in 18th Century New England @ Tyringham Union Church
Jul 21 @ 10:00 am

Join Judy Putnam Hartley, Stockbridge Munsee Mohican tribal elder, as she discusses the “friendly” Indians who encountered and fed  Henry Hudson in 1609. By the time the Mohicans moved to Stockbridge in the 1730s they had a history of navigating European interactions. The Mohicans willingly served alongside the Colonists in wartime, yet the failure of English-Mohican shared governance in Stockbridge and unsatisfactory court petitions regarding land disputes repeatedly called into question whether the relationship was one of friends, enemies or both? Ms. Hartley will share some of her ancestors’ own words in reflecting on these encounters.

Members: $10. Non-members: $15.

Lenox, MA– Pleasant Valley Wildlife Ramble with Mass Audubon Staff @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 21 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 0 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $5.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $6.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.

Explore the lower trails at Pleasant Valley with an experienced guide. We’ll search for evidence of (and hopefully see!) many wild birds and mammals as we hike along the rich pond and stream ecosystems that form the heart of the sanctuary. Along the way we’ll also learn about plant communities and the dynamic history of Pleasant Valley.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Monterey, MA–A Guided Walk: Retracing Native Histories on the Landscape @ The Bidwell House Museum
Jul 21 @ 1:00 pm

Join guide Rob Hoogs to explore a new interpretive trail as you retrace the steps of the Native Americans—specifically the local Stockbridge Band of the Mohican Tribe—who lived and hunted in this area for thousands of years. Adults $15, Seniors $8 and children are free. This fee includes a guided house tour either before or after the guided walk

Call the Museum to pre-register, 413-528-6888.

A Colonial History Museum–a National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1750s

 

==

Stockbridge, MA–“On the Town”
Jul 21 @ 4:00 pm

The Stockbridge Library, Museum & Archives will present “On the Town”, a series of monthly programs in five different parts of Stockbridge. Each month, a volunteer from the Museum & Archives will lead a one-hour tour, explaining the buildings at the site and talking about some of the people who lived there. All programs will be held at 4:00 p.m. on the third Saturday of the month. $5.00 suggested donation.

On Saturday, June 16 , the tour will focus on the area that used to be the center of town, which now includes Procter Hall, the Golf Club, the Children’s Chimes, and more.

Meet in the parking lot across from the Stockbridge Cemetery, Main Street (Route 102).

Jul
22
Sun
Lenox, MA–Canoeing the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 22 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.
This leisurely paddle will take us through the ecologically rich Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in Lenox. We’ll watch for swallows, herons, kingfishers, muskrats, and signs of beavers along the scenic and meandering Housatonic River and learn about why the waterway is the natural heart of the Berkshires.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Jul
24
Tue
Lenox, MA–Birding at the Mount with Mass Audubon @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Jul 24 @ 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Audience: Adult Members & Nonmembers: Free
Explore Edith Wharton’s original estate, including woods, wetlands, and meadows. You’ll learn skills for birding by sight and song as we look for numerous bird species, including bobolinks, bald eagles, vireos, and wood warblers.

For more details and registration (optional) call (413) 551-5111

Lenox, MA–Summer Tea & Talk: The Invention of the American Art Museum @ Ventfort Hall
Jul 24 @ 4:00 pm

Fine arts historian Kathleen Curran will exhibit in-depth knowledge on the transformation of the American art museum based on her book The Invention of the American Art Museum: From Craft to Kulturgeschichte, 1870 – 1930. After 1906, the earliest institutions were transformed from their craft museum formats into Kulturgeschichte (cultural history) installations. Visitors could now enter a museum room and step into another place and time that expressed a common visual vocabulary of a historical age.

Reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited.
Cost is $26.00 with an advance registration and $32.00 the day of. Member cost is $26.00. Call us at (413) 637-3206 for reservations.

Jul
25
Wed
Lenox, MA–Evening at the Beaver Ponds with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 25 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 3 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $6.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $4.00

Enjoy an evening searching for beavers and other wildlife that frequent our wildlife sanctuary ponds. Learn about the lives of beavers, their amazing recovery story, and how they continue to shape the landscape more than 80 years after their reintroduction to the area.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
26
Thu
Stockbridge, MA–CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP: Draw In! Sketching Our World @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Jul 26 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

For children ages 7 and up

Use drawing as a tool for discovery in these hands-on series of fun classes that will explore both the outdoors and the works on view, using pencil, pastel, and other dry media. $7 children, $5 members.

 

Stockbridge, MA–Historic Property Walks @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Jul 26 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Enjoy these guided strolls on the Museum’s bucolic 36-acre site and learn about the historic buildings on its property, including Linwood House, an 1859 Berkshire Cottage, and Norman Rockwell’s own Stockbridge Studio. We’ll also explore the sculptural installations of Peter Rockwell, a noted stone carver and historian, and the artist’s youngest son.

Free for Museum members, or included with Museum admission.

==

Jul
27
Fri
Lenox, MA–Evening at the Beaver Ponds with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 27 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 3 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $6.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $4.00

Enjoy an evening searching for beavers and other wildlife that frequent our wildlife sanctuary ponds. Learn about the lives of beavers, their amazing recovery story, and how they continue to shape the landscape more than 80 years after their reintroduction to the area.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
28
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 28 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Lenox, MA–Learn the Ferns with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 28 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Audience: Adult
Members: $10.00 Nonmembers: $15.00
Are ferns a mystery to you? Travel with botanist and fern expert Joe Strauch, on a journey into the fascinating world of ferns, to learn clues that reveal their true identity. We’ll learn how to identify a fresh assortment of local ferns, then head outside to test our new skills. Easy-to-use
Fern Finder guides will help you identify the 50 species in Berkshire County. Cost includes a copy of the Fern Finder. Bring a hand lens if you have one.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Lenox, Ma–Paddling on the Housatonic River:  In Search of Turtles
Jul 28 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
Lenox, Ma–Paddling on the Housatonic River:  In Search of Turtles

Trip Length: 3 – 4 miles Level: Beginner (6+yrs)

Paddle downstream from Woods Pond and back enjoying the Housatonic River as we search for painted and other turtle species basking along the river’s edge and learn about these ancient reptiles that are struggling to maintain their populations. This paddle trip is suitable for families with children 6 yrs and older.

Registration is required, space is limited. Call 413-298-7024
Canoes and equipment provided or register to bring your own boat.
Trip information provided upon completion of registration.

In partnership with: THE HOUSATONIC HERITAGE AREA

====

Get on the river! The best way to enjoy this gorgeous body of water is through a paddling trip.  Housatonic River paddle trips are suitable for most skill levels (see individual descriptions) and are an ideal way to see the river.

CALL 413-298-7024 TO REGISTER or EMAIL
Registration is required as space is limited. Canoes and equipment provided. Trip information provided upon completion of registration.
=====

Jul
29
Sun
Lenox, MA–Canoeing the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 29 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.
This leisurely paddle will take us through the ecologically rich Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in Lenox. We’ll watch for swallows, herons, kingfishers, muskrats, and signs of beavers along the scenic and meandering Housatonic River and learn about why the waterway is the natural heart of the Berkshires.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Lanesborough/Adams, MA–Free Public Program: Civilian Conservation Corp ON Mount Greylock (History Presentation/Talk) @ Bascom Lodge-Atop Mount Greylock
Jul 29 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

THIS IS A “FREE” PUBLIC PROGRAMMING EVENT OFFERED IN COLLABORATION WITH THE UPPER HOUSATONIC VALLEY NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA.

THIS FREE EVENT IS FOLLOWED AT 7 PM, BY AN OPTIONAL PRIX FIXE DINNER MENU that CHANGES NIGHTLY. (ONE SEATING ONLY). RESERVATIONS REQUESTED.
THE KITCHEN AT BASCOM LODGE IS COMMITTED TO PROVIDING FRESH, HAND-MADE FOOD, CRAFTED FROM INGREDIENTS PURCHASED FROM LOCAL, FAMILY OWNED FARMS.

CALL: 413-743-1591, EMAIL US AT: MAIL@BASCOMLODGE.NET, OR CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR EACH EVENING’S MENU

AT AN ELEVATION OF 3,491 FEET, BASCOM LODGE AT THE SUMMIT OF MOUNT GREYLOCK DOMINATES THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE; AFFORDING PARK VISTAS OF FOUR STATES AND FIVE MOUNTAIN RANGES. LOCATED IN THE HEART OF BERKSHIRE COUNTY, THE LODGE IS A RUSTIC ARTS AND CRAFTS MOUNTAIN LODGE BUILT IN THE 1930’S BY VOLUNTEERS FROM THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS. CONSTRUCTED OF LOCAL STONE AND OLD GROWTH RED SPRUCE TIMBERS, THE LODGE
WAS DESIGNED IN AN ARCHITECTURAL STYLE THAT WOULD LATER BECOME THE BLUEPRINT FOR AMERICA’S NATIONAL PARKS. NESTLED ON THE SUMMIT OF MT. GREYLOCK, THE STATE’S HIGHEST MOUNTAIN, THE LODGE IS THE CENTERPIECE OF A 12,500 ACRE WILDERNESS PARK.

FROM RT 7, DRIVE TO LANESBOROUGH AND WATCH FOR THE MOUNT GREYLOCK RESERVATION AND VISITOR CENTER SIGNS (2 MILES NORTH OF LANESBORO TOWN LINE). TURN ONTO NORTH MAIN STREET, THEN BEAR RIGHT ONTO QUARRY ROAD, THEN BEAR LEFT ONTO ROCKWELL ROAD AND FOLLOW MOUNT GREYLOCK/BASCOM LODGE SIGNS FOR 9 MILES THROUGH THE FOREST TO THE SUMMIT.

413-743-1591, www.bascomlodge.net

Jul
31
Tue
Lenox, MA–Birding at the Mount with Mass Audubon @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Jul 31 @ 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Audience: Adult Members & Nonmembers: Free
Explore Edith Wharton’s original estate, including woods, wetlands, and meadows. You’ll learn skills for birding by sight and song as we look for numerous bird species, including bobolinks, bald eagles, vireos, and wood warblers.

For more details and registration (optional) call (413) 551-5111

Lenox, MA–Summer Tea & Talk: The Winchester: The Gun That Built an American Dynasty @ Ventfort Hall
Jul 31 @ 4:00 pm

Laura Trevelyan, a British anchor of BBC World News America on PBS, is a descendant of the American Winchester family, the colorful New England clan responsible for the creation of the “Gun That Won the West.” Based on her new book The Winchester: The Gun That Built an American Dynasty, she will explore a favorite of collectors, celebrated in fiction, glorified in Hollywood and endorsed by Annie Oakley, Theodore Roosevelt and certain Native Americans who called it “the spirit gun.”

Reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited.
Cost is $26.00 with an advance registration and $32.00 the day of. Member cost is $26.00. Call us at (413) 637-3206 for reservations.

Pittsfield, MA–Word x Word Event: Story Slam / Impeachable Offenses @ Berkshire Athenaeum, Pittsfield’s Public Library
Jul 31 @ 7:00 pm

First person, true stories told without notes or props – similar to NPR’s Moth Story Slam. Scored olympic-style by volunteers from the audience. Register online

Aug
1
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–Word x Word Event: Poetry sCrawl
Aug 1 @ 4:00 pm

Open to all ages, styles and experience level. The coolest thing to happen on North Street. A “moving” open-mic style event open to all ages and themes. Perfect for poets, soon-to-be-poets, and just-sticking-my-toe-in-the-water-poets. Join us for an optional workshop at 4P (for a little inspiration) or meet us at Dottie’s for the sCrawl!

August 1, @ 4 pm
sCrawl Workshop
Hotel On North, 297 North Street, Pittsfield
Poets of all ages & varieties are invited to join us for a generative workshop. And then stick around for the sCrawl and a chance to take your work for a walk. Preregistration required. Register online

Pittsfield, MA–Word x Word Event: Poetry sCrawl
Aug 1 @ 6:00 pm

Starts at Dottie’s, 444 North Street, Pittsfield & ends at the Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, 28 Renne Ave

Poetry takes a walk Uptown – followed by an reception and open mic. Register online
Poetry sCrawl . A “moving” open-mic style event open to all ages and themes. Possibly the coolest thing that happens on North Street. Perfect for poets of all ages, soon-to-be-poets, and just-sticking-my-toe-in-the-water-poets.
—-

Aug
2
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–2nd Annual Moby Dick Reading Marathon @ Arrowhead Museum
Aug 2 all-day

Where it was written… Over the winter of 1850-1851, Herman Melville worked in his study at Arrowhead, creating one of the greatest works in American literature. From August 2 – 5, the Berkshire County Historical Society at Arrowhead is pleased to host the second annual marathon reading of that great work, Moby-Dick. Please join us!

On August 2, 3, and 4, the reading will begin each day at 10 am and conclude at 5 pm. On the final day, Sunday, August 5, the reading will resume at 1 pm (after the annual hike up Monument Mountain) and then continue until the exciting conclusion (approximately 5:15).

TO BE A MARATHON MOBY DICK READER:

If you are interested in reading, please fill in the form at www.berkshirehistory.org, in the post labeled “Sign up to read Moby-Dick at the 2nd annual marathon.”

We will reserve one slot – depending on availability – per reader. It is possible that once you arrive, additional slots may be available.
Please indicate your preferred day and hour. If there is space available, you will be assigned to read sometime within that hour, and we’ll let you know by e-mail. Each reader is scheduled for 10 minutes.

If you sign up before June 11, your name will be included in the official program. Please indicate how you’d you like your name spelled.
NOTE: A few hours are already reserved; these hours will not be visible on the form.
You’ll receive a confirmation of your assigned time via return e-mail.
TEAMS – if you can put together a team of six readers, contact us at mobydickmarathon@berkshirehistory.org

-Each reader will get a special sticker. This indicates you have read Moby-Dick at Arrowhead, and entitles you to 10% off merchandise in the shop. Discount is valid during the days of the marathon.
-We cannot “save” passages for any individual–the scheduling would be too complex. When it’s your 10 minutes, you’re at the podium. It’s all good!
-We’ll supply a copy of Moby-Dick that all readers will read from. If you want to bring along your own copy to follow when you are not reading, that’s fine.
-There is no charge for reading. (But donations to support Arrowhead are gratefully accepted.)

Stockbridge, MA–CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP: Draw In! Sketching Our World @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Aug 2 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

For children ages 7 and up

Use drawing as a tool for discovery in these hands-on series of fun classes that will explore both the outdoors and the works on view, using pencil, pastel, and other dry media. $7 children, $5 members.

 

Stockbridge, MA–Historic Property Walks @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Aug 2 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Enjoy these guided strolls on the Museum’s bucolic 36-acre site and learn about the historic buildings on its property, including Linwood House, an 1859 Berkshire Cottage, and Norman Rockwell’s own Stockbridge Studio. We’ll also explore the sculptural installations of Peter Rockwell, a noted stone carver and historian, and the artist’s youngest son.

Free for Museum members, or included with Museum admission.

==

Aug
3
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–2nd Annual Moby Dick Reading Marathon @ Arrowhead Museum
Aug 3 all-day

Where it was written… Over the winter of 1850-1851, Herman Melville worked in his study at Arrowhead, creating one of the greatest works in American literature. From August 2 – 5, the Berkshire County Historical Society at Arrowhead is pleased to host the second annual marathon reading of that great work, Moby-Dick. Please join us!

On August 2, 3, and 4, the reading will begin each day at 10 am and conclude at 5 pm. On the final day, Sunday, August 5, the reading will resume at 1 pm (after the annual hike up Monument Mountain) and then continue until the exciting conclusion (approximately 5:15).

TO BE A MARATHON MOBY DICK READER:

If you are interested in reading, please fill in the form at www.berkshirehistory.org, in the post labeled “Sign up to read Moby-Dick at the 2nd annual marathon.”

We will reserve one slot – depending on availability – per reader. It is possible that once you arrive, additional slots may be available.
Please indicate your preferred day and hour. If there is space available, you will be assigned to read sometime within that hour, and we’ll let you know by e-mail. Each reader is scheduled for 10 minutes.

If you sign up before June 11, your name will be included in the official program. Please indicate how you’d you like your name spelled.
NOTE: A few hours are already reserved; these hours will not be visible on the form.
You’ll receive a confirmation of your assigned time via return e-mail.
TEAMS – if you can put together a team of six readers, contact us at mobydickmarathon@berkshirehistory.org

-Each reader will get a special sticker. This indicates you have read Moby-Dick at Arrowhead, and entitles you to 10% off merchandise in the shop. Discount is valid during the days of the marathon.
-We cannot “save” passages for any individual–the scheduling would be too complex. When it’s your 10 minutes, you’re at the podium. It’s all good!
-We’ll supply a copy of Moby-Dick that all readers will read from. If you want to bring along your own copy to follow when you are not reading, that’s fine.
-There is no charge for reading. (But donations to support Arrowhead are gratefully accepted.)

Aug
4
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–2nd Annual Moby Dick Reading Marathon @ Arrowhead Museum
Aug 4 all-day

Where it was written… Over the winter of 1850-1851, Herman Melville worked in his study at Arrowhead, creating one of the greatest works in American literature. From August 2 – 5, the Berkshire County Historical Society at Arrowhead is pleased to host the second annual marathon reading of that great work, Moby-Dick. Please join us!

On August 2, 3, and 4, the reading will begin each day at 10 am and conclude at 5 pm. On the final day, Sunday, August 5, the reading will resume at 1 pm (after the annual hike up Monument Mountain) and then continue until the exciting conclusion (approximately 5:15).

TO BE A MARATHON MOBY DICK READER:

If you are interested in reading, please fill in the form at www.berkshirehistory.org, in the post labeled “Sign up to read Moby-Dick at the 2nd annual marathon.”

We will reserve one slot – depending on availability – per reader. It is possible that once you arrive, additional slots may be available.
Please indicate your preferred day and hour. If there is space available, you will be assigned to read sometime within that hour, and we’ll let you know by e-mail. Each reader is scheduled for 10 minutes.

If you sign up before June 11, your name will be included in the official program. Please indicate how you’d you like your name spelled.
NOTE: A few hours are already reserved; these hours will not be visible on the form.
You’ll receive a confirmation of your assigned time via return e-mail.
TEAMS – if you can put together a team of six readers, contact us at mobydickmarathon@berkshirehistory.org

-Each reader will get a special sticker. This indicates you have read Moby-Dick at Arrowhead, and entitles you to 10% off merchandise in the shop. Discount is valid during the days of the marathon.
-We cannot “save” passages for any individual–the scheduling would be too complex. When it’s your 10 minutes, you’re at the podium. It’s all good!
-We’ll supply a copy of Moby-Dick that all readers will read from. If you want to bring along your own copy to follow when you are not reading, that’s fine.
-There is no charge for reading. (But donations to support Arrowhead are gratefully accepted.)

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 4 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
5
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–2nd Annual Moby Dick Reading Marathon @ Arrowhead Museum
Aug 5 all-day

Where it was written… Over the winter of 1850-1851, Herman Melville worked in his study at Arrowhead, creating one of the greatest works in American literature. From August 2 – 5, the Berkshire County Historical Society at Arrowhead is pleased to host the second annual marathon reading of that great work, Moby-Dick. Please join us!

On August 2, 3, and 4, the reading will begin each day at 10 am and conclude at 5 pm. On the final day, Sunday, August 5, the reading will resume at 1 pm (after the annual hike up Monument Mountain) and then continue until the exciting conclusion (approximately 5:15).

TO BE A MARATHON MOBY DICK READER:

If you are interested in reading, please fill in the form at www.berkshirehistory.org, in the post labeled “Sign up to read Moby-Dick at the 2nd annual marathon.”

We will reserve one slot – depending on availability – per reader. It is possible that once you arrive, additional slots may be available.
Please indicate your preferred day and hour. If there is space available, you will be assigned to read sometime within that hour, and we’ll let you know by e-mail. Each reader is scheduled for 10 minutes.

If you sign up before June 11, your name will be included in the official program. Please indicate how you’d you like your name spelled.
NOTE: A few hours are already reserved; these hours will not be visible on the form.
You’ll receive a confirmation of your assigned time via return e-mail.
TEAMS – if you can put together a team of six readers, contact us at mobydickmarathon@berkshirehistory.org

-Each reader will get a special sticker. This indicates you have read Moby-Dick at Arrowhead, and entitles you to 10% off merchandise in the shop. Discount is valid during the days of the marathon.
-We cannot “save” passages for any individual–the scheduling would be too complex. When it’s your 10 minutes, you’re at the podium. It’s all good!
-We’ll supply a copy of Moby-Dick that all readers will read from. If you want to bring along your own copy to follow when you are not reading, that’s fine.
-There is no charge for reading. (But donations to support Arrowhead are gratefully accepted.)

Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Aug 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Aug
7
Tue
Lenox, MA–Summer Tea & Talk: Lanz & Isabel Anderson, Gilded Age Globetrotting Collectors @ Ventfort Hall
Aug 7 @ 4:00 pm

“Isabel and Larz Anderson, Gilded Age Globetrotting Collectors” will be discovered as a wealthy, well-connected, cosmopolitan and intellectually curious couple who assembled rare objects for their homes in Brookline, MA, and Washington, D.C. Historical researcher Stephen Moskey and art historian Isabel Taube will present a case study, Native American objects that they discovered in 2014, once presumed lost, in long-term storage in a Boston museum.

Reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited.
Cost is $26.00 with an advance registration and $32.00 the day of. Member cost is $26.00. Call us at (413) 637-3206 for reservations.

Aug
9
Thu
Stockbridge, MA–CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP: Draw In! Sketching Our World @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Aug 9 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

For children ages 7 and up

Use drawing as a tool for discovery in these hands-on series of fun classes that will explore both the outdoors and the works on view, using pencil, pastel, and other dry media. $7 children, $5 members.

 

Stockbridge, MA–Historic Property Walks @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Aug 9 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Enjoy these guided strolls on the Museum’s bucolic 36-acre site and learn about the historic buildings on its property, including Linwood House, an 1859 Berkshire Cottage, and Norman Rockwell’s own Stockbridge Studio. We’ll also explore the sculptural installations of Peter Rockwell, a noted stone carver and historian, and the artist’s youngest son.

Free for Museum members, or included with Museum admission.

==

Aug
11
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 11 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
12
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Aug 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Aug
14
Tue
Lenox, MA–Summer Tea & Talk: Crystal Palaces: The London, New York and Paris World’s Fairs, 1851-1855 @ Ventfort Hall
Aug 14 @ 4:00 pm

Popular architectural historian Francis Morrone returns to peer into “Crystal Palaces: The London, New York and Paris World’s Fairs, 1850 – 1855.” These were three of the greatest expositions of the 19th century. Each centered on a massive iron-and-glass exhibition hall, none of which survive. They were showcases for inventions in the greatest age of inventions. The present-day pales in comparison when it comes to the latest inventions, says Morrone.

Reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited.
Cost is $26.00 with an advance registration and $32.00 the day of. Member cost is $26.00. Call us at (413) 637-3206 for reservations.

Aug
16
Thu
Stockbridge, MA–CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP: Draw In! Sketching Our World @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Aug 16 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

For children ages 7 and up

Use drawing as a tool for discovery in these hands-on series of fun classes that will explore both the outdoors and the works on view, using pencil, pastel, and other dry media. $7 children, $5 members.

 

Stockbridge, MA–Historic Property Walks @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Aug 16 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Enjoy these guided strolls on the Museum’s bucolic 36-acre site and learn about the historic buildings on its property, including Linwood House, an 1859 Berkshire Cottage, and Norman Rockwell’s own Stockbridge Studio. We’ll also explore the sculptural installations of Peter Rockwell, a noted stone carver and historian, and the artist’s youngest son.

Free for Museum members, or included with Museum admission.

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Aug
18
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 18 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Stockbridge, MA–“On the Town”
Aug 18 @ 4:00 pm

The Stockbridge Library, Museum & Archives will present “On the Town”, a series of monthly programs in five different parts of Stockbridge. Each month, a volunteer from the Museum & Archives will lead a one-hour tour, explaining the buildings at the site and talking about some of the people who lived there. All programs will be held at 4:00 p.m. on the third Saturday of the month. $5.00 suggested donation.

On Saturday, June 16 , the tour will focus on the area that used to be the center of town, which now includes Procter Hall, the Golf Club, the Children’s Chimes, and more.

Meet in the parking lot across from the Stockbridge Cemetery, Main Street (Route 102).

Aug
19
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Aug 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Aug
21
Tue
Lenox, MA–Summer Tea & Talk: Henry Coit Perkins, 1839: Pioneer Photographer @ Ventfort Hall
Aug 21 @ 4:00 pm

Susan Edwards, executive director of the Museum of Old Newbury, will focus on “Henry Coit Perkins, 1839: Pioneer Photographer.” In that year, he most likely took the country’s first town views, those of Newburyport, MA. He had begun to experiment with the French daguerreotype process. Edwards will reveal recent research on Perkins and will chronicle the work of Louis Daguerre and others. Early Berkshire photography will be viewed as well.

Reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited.
Cost is $26.00 with an advance registration and $32.00 the day of. Member cost is $26.00. Call us at (413) 637-3206 for reservations.

Aug
23
Thu
Stockbridge, MA–CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP: Draw In! Sketching Our World @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Aug 23 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

For children ages 7 and up

Use drawing as a tool for discovery in these hands-on series of fun classes that will explore both the outdoors and the works on view, using pencil, pastel, and other dry media. $7 children, $5 members.

 

Stockbridge, MA–Historic Property Walks @ Norman Rockwell Museum
Aug 23 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Enjoy these guided strolls on the Museum’s bucolic 36-acre site and learn about the historic buildings on its property, including Linwood House, an 1859 Berkshire Cottage, and Norman Rockwell’s own Stockbridge Studio. We’ll also explore the sculptural installations of Peter Rockwell, a noted stone carver and historian, and the artist’s youngest son.

Free for Museum members, or included with Museum admission.

==

Aug
25
Sat
Gt. Barrington, MA– Family Paddling Trip on the Housatonic River
Aug 25 @ 9:00 am – 3:00 pm
Gt. Barrington, MA-- Family Paddling Trip on the Housatonic River

Get on the river! The best way to enjoy this gorgeous body of water is through a paddling trip. Housatonic River paddle trips are suitable for most skill levels (see individual descriptions) and are an ideal way to see the river.

CALL 413-298-7024 TO REGISTER or EMAIL– PADDLE@HVATODAY.ORG
Registration is required as space is limited. Canoes and equipment provided. Trip information provided upon completion of registration.
=====

Trip Length: 6.6 miles Level: Beginner (10+yrs)

Get your family out for a day of river exploration! We’ll paddle from Bridge Street, Great Barrington to the Covered Bridge in Sheffield stopping for lunch on a sandbar where the Green River joins the Housatonic. This meandering stretch of the Housatonic River is mostly calm with occasional quickwater and downed trees to negotiate. Suitable for families with children 10+yrs.

Registration is required, space is limited. Call 413-298-7024
Canoes and equipment provided or register to bring your own boat.
Trip information provided upon completion of registration.

In partnership with: THE HOUSATONIC HERITAGE AREA

 

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 25 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Monterey, MA–Retracing Native Histories on the Landscape – Guided Walk @ The Bidwell House Museum
Aug 25 @ 1:00 pm

Join guide Rob Hoogs to explore a new interpretive trail as you retrace the steps of the Native Americans—specifically the local Stockbridge Band of the Mohican Tribe—who lived and hunted in this area for thousands of years.

Adults $15, Seniors $8 and children are free. This fee includes a guided house tour either before or after the guided walk. Call the Museum to pre-register, 413-528-6888.

A Colonial History Museum–a National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1750s