Events

Event Calendar for The Berkshires and Litchfield County

Jun
26
Sat
Sharon, CT–Community Bird Tour @ Sharon Audubon Center
Jun 26 @ 8:30 am – 10:00 am
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jun 26 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Jun
27
Sun
Lanesboro/Adams, MA–(Bascom Lodge talk & dine presentation)–The Birds of Mount Greylock with Ed Neumuth, speaker @ Bascom Lodge at the Summit of Mt. Greylock
Jun 27 @ 6:00 pm

ESTABLISHED IN 1898, THE RESERVATION WAS THE FIRST LAND PRESERVED-IN-TRUST FOR THE CITIZENS OF MASSACHUSETTS AS A WILDERNESS PARK; THE FLAGSHIP PROPERTY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND RECREATION.

AT AN ELEVATION OF 3,491 FEET, MT. GREYLOCK DOMINATES THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE, AFFORDING VISITORS TO THE PARK VISTAS OF FOUR STATES AND FIVE MOUNTAIN RANGES. WITH OVER 70 MILES OF WOODLAND TRAILS, INCLUDING AN 11 MILE SECTION OF THE APPALACHIAN TRAIL THAT PASSES WITHIN A FEW FEET OF THE LODGE’S FRONT DOOR, THE RESERVATION ENABLES GUESTS ACCESS TO A DIVERSE ARRAY OF OUTDOOR EXPERIENCES.
===

Jul
3
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 3 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Jul
10
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 10 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Monterey, MA: History Talk- In the Shadow of the Founders “Greatest Generations” in American History. @ Bidwell House Museum
Jul 10 @ 10:00 am

A talk by John Demos, Samuel Knight Professor of American History Emeritus at Yale University and award-winning author. At several strategic points in the American past, events have cast a particular generational cohort in a special, outsize role. Demos will discuss how Their lives and deeds have given a distinctive shape to our history, a recurrent and transformative charge of renewal.

To be held at the Bidwell House Museum for a limited in-person audience and also streamed via Zoom.

Members: Free. Non-members: $10. 10 a.m. Attendees must register on the Museum’s website.

413-528-6888
email: bidwellhouse@gmail.com
www.bidwellhousemuseum.org

The Berkshires Early American History Museum
National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1760s

Jul
11
Sun
Pittsfield, Massachusetts— Dr. Caroline Hellman lecture and reading from her book Children of the Raven and the Whale: Visions and Revisions in American Literature @ Herman Melville’s Arrowhead Museum barn
Jul 11 @ 3:00 pm

Tickets are $10 for BCHS members, $15 for non members
Hosted by the The Berkshire County Historical Society
Children of the Raven and the Whale: Visions and Revisions in American Literature looks at how contemporary United States writers have responded to texts such as Moby-Dick that were historically central to the American literary canon. In their rewritings and layering of new stories over older ones, contemporary writers chronicle a spectrum of American experience, and appraise the project of the United States. This talk will explore Melville’s influence on the work of author Ta-Nehisi Coates, in addition to discussing the larger landscape of American literature today.

Dr. Hellman is Professor of English at New York City College of Technology, of the City University of New York.

COVID-19 CODE OF COURTESY
The Berkshire County Historical Society is part of a Berkshire-based consortium of cultural organizations, who have developed a unified COVID-19 Code of Courtesy that addresses public safety for visitors. These guidelines have been reviewed and endorsed by the Berkshire Public Health Alliance and Tri Town Health Department for their respective communities. For complete details, visit mobydick.org.

The Berkshire County Historical Society is a non-profit corporation dedicated to collecting, preserving, and disseminating the history of Berkshire County in western Massachusetts. In addition, the Berkshire County Historical Society is committed to the preservation and interpretation of Arrowhead, home of author Herman Melville, designated a National Historic Landmark. The Berkshire County Historical Society provides tours of Arrowhead, and programming dedicated to the history of western Massachusetts and the life and writings of Herman Melville.

Jul
17
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 17 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Monterey, MA: History Talk – Prisons in Colonial America. @ Bidwell House Museum
Jul 17 @ 10:00 am

A talk by Princeton Professor Wendy Warren. We think of the current carceral crisis in the United States as a purely modern phenomenon. This talk will explain the long history of prisons in North America, and examine what has not changed between the earliest prisons and today. To be held at the Bidwell House Museum for a limited in-person audience and also streamed via Zoom.

Members: Free. Non-members: $10.

Attendees must register on the Museum’s website.

The Bidwell House Museum
413-528-6888
email: bidwellhouse@gmail.com
www.bidwellhousemuseum.org

The Berkshires Early American History Museum
National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1760s

Monterey, MA: Maker Day at the Bidwell House Museum @ Bidwell House Museum
Jul 17 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Spend an afternoon at the Bidwell House Museum watching local artisans perform traditional craft demonstrations. Visitors can also take a self-guided tour of the Native American Interpretive Trail, view the gardens and hike on the trails. . FREE.

413-528-6888
email: bidwellhouse@gmail.com
www.bidwellhousemuseum.org

The Berkshires Early American History Museum
National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1760s

Jul
19
Mon
Lenox, MA-Heather Clark: Red Comet: The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath, Lecture @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Jul 19 @ 4:00 pm

Monday, July 19 at 4 pm and Tuesday, July 20 at 11 am

Members $25, General $30
Our popular Summer Lecture Series is back! Join us, under an open-air tent, for lectures from today’s leading biographers and historians

 

Jul
20
Tue
Lenox, MA-Heather Clark: Red Comet: The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath, Lecture @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Jul 20 @ 11:00 am

Monday, July 19 at 4 pm and Tuesday, July 20 at 11 am

Members $25, General $30
Our popular Summer Lecture Series is back! Join us, under an open-air tent, for lectures from today’s leading biographers and historians

 

Jul
24
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 24 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Jul
31
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 31 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
2
Mon
Lenox, MA–Maggie Doherty The Equivalents: A Story of Art, Female Friendship, and Liberation in the 1960s, Lecture @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Aug 2 @ 4:00 pm

Monday, August 2 at 4 pm and Tuesday, August 3 at 11 am

Members $25, General $30
Our popular Summer Lecture Series is back! Join us, under an open-air tent, for lectures from today’s leading biographers and historians

The Mount, Edith Wharton’s Home

Aug
3
Tue
Lenox, MA–Maggie Doherty The Equivalents: A Story of Art, Female Friendship, and Liberation in the 1960s, Lecture @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Aug 3 @ 11:00 am

Monday, August 2 at 4 pm and Tuesday, August 3 at 11 am

Members $25, General $30
Our popular Summer Lecture Series is back! Join us, under an open-air tent, for lectures from today’s leading biographers and historians

The Mount, Edith Wharton’s Home

Aug
7
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 7 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
9
Mon
Lenox, MA–Sydney Ladensohn Stern The Brothers Mankiewicz: Hope, Heartbreak, and Hollywood Classics, Lecture @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Aug 9 @ 4:00 pm

Monday, August 9 at 4 pm and Tuesday, August 10 at 11 am

Members $25, General $30
Our popular Summer Lecture Series is back! Join us, under an open-air tent, for lectures from today’s leading biographers and historians

The Mount, Edith Wharton’s Home

Aug
10
Tue
Lenox, MA–Sydney Ladensohn Stern The Brothers Mankiewicz: Hope, Heartbreak, and Hollywood Classics, Lecture @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Aug 10 @ 11:00 am

Monday, August 9 at 4 pm and Tuesday, August 10 at 11 am

Members $25, General $30
Our popular Summer Lecture Series is back! Join us, under an open-air tent, for lectures from today’s leading biographers and historians

The Mount, Edith Wharton’s Home

Aug
14
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 14 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
16
Mon
Lenox, MA–Debby Applegate on Madam: The Life of Polly Adler, Icon of the Jazz Age, Lecture @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Aug 16 @ 4:00 pm

Monday, August 16 at 4 pm and Tuesday, August 17 at 11 am

Members $25, General $30
Our popular Summer Lecture Series is back! Join us, under an open-air tent, for lectures from today’s leading biographers and historians

The Mount, Edith Wharton’s Home

===

Aug
17
Tue
Lenox, MA–Debby Applegate on Madam: The Life of Polly Adler, Icon of the Jazz Age, Lecture @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Aug 17 @ 11:00 am

Monday, August 16 at 4 pm and Tuesday, August 17 at 11 am

Members $25, General $30
Our popular Summer Lecture Series is back! Join us, under an open-air tent, for lectures from today’s leading biographers and historians

The Mount, Edith Wharton’s Home

===

Aug
21
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 21 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
23
Mon
Lenox, MA–Lisa Napoli: Susan, Linda, Nina, and Cokie: The Extraordinary Story of the Founding Mothers of NPR, Lecture @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Aug 23 @ 4:00 pm

Monday, August 23 at 4 pm and Tuesday, August 24 at 11 am

Members $25, General $30
Our popular Summer Lecture Series is back! Join us, under an open-air tent, for lectures from today’s leading biographers and historians

The Mount, Edith Wharton’s Home

==

Aug
24
Tue
Lenox, MA–Lisa Napoli: Susan, Linda, Nina, and Cokie: The Extraordinary Story of the Founding Mothers of NPR, Lecture @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Aug 24 @ 11:00 am

Monday, August 23 at 4 pm and Tuesday, August 24 at 11 am

Members $25, General $30
Our popular Summer Lecture Series is back! Join us, under an open-air tent, for lectures from today’s leading biographers and historians

The Mount, Edith Wharton’s Home

==

Aug
28
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 28 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
30
Mon
Lenox,MA–Julia Sweig: Lady Bird Johnson: Hiding in Plain Sight, Lecture @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Aug 30 @ 4:00 pm

Monday, August 30 at 4 pm and Tuesday, August 31 at 4 pm

Members $25, General $30
Our popular Summer Lecture Series is back! Join us, under an open-air tent, for lectures from today’s leading biographers and historians

The Mount, Edith Wharton’s Home

Aug
31
Tue
Lenox,MA–Julia Sweig: Lady Bird Johnson: Hiding in Plain Sight, Lecture @ The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home
Aug 31 @ 11:00 am

Monday, August 30 at 4 pm and Tuesday, August 31 at 11 am

Members $25, General $30
Our popular Summer Lecture Series is back! Join us, under an open-air tent, for lectures from today’s leading biographers and historians

The Mount, Edith Wharton’s Home

Sep
4
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Sep 4 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Sep
11
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Sep 11 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Sep
18
Sat
Monterey, MA: Raid on Township #1 – Reenactment Weekend. @ Bidwell House Museum
Sep 18 @ 10:00 am – Sep 19 @ 2:00 pm

Experience a recreation of raids conducted by British Regular Forces along with Native and Loyalist allies in the Mohawk Valley after the Saratoga Campaign, 1778-1783. Reenactors will put on two public battle demonstrations to show how the raids were conducted, as well as provide visitors an idea of what the military camps looked like when both the British and Continental Armies were in Campaign. Cooking and sewing projects as well as fatigue duty will help bring to life a camp during the American Revolution.

Reenactment open 10-4 on Saturday and 10-2 on Sunday.

Pre-registration is required. Tickets are $15/person for Members and $20/person for non-Members. Children 12 and under are Free. Tickets go on sale in August.

The Bidwell House Museum

413-528-6888
email: bidwellhouse@gmail.com
www.bidwellhousemuseum.org

The Berkshires Early American History Museum
National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1760s