Events

Apr
25
Wed
Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 25 @ 10:00 am – 10:45 am

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 25 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 25 @ 2:00 pm – 2:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 25 @ 3:00 pm – 3:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Lenox, MA–Woodcock’s Sky Dance @  Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Apr 25 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 6 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $5.00, Child free Nonmembers: Adult $7.00, Child free

Love is in the air as the sun sets in early spring. Wet meadows and fields become the American woodcock’s “runway” for a beautiful aerial courtship display. We will visit our meadows at dusk and listen and watch for the woodcock’s performance on their breeding grounds, just before darkness envelops the sanctuary. With any luck, male woodcocks may be heard peenting from the tall grass before spiraling hundreds of feet into night sky. Viewing the woodcock’s sky dance is a natural spectacle that shouldn’t be missed.

Register at    massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or call (413) 637-0320

Apr
26
Thu
Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 26 @ 10:00 am – 10:45 am

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 26 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 26 @ 2:00 pm – 2:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 26 @ 3:00 pm – 3:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Apr
27
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–Birding at Canoe Meadows @ Canoe Meadows Wildlife Sanctuary
Apr 27 @ 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Spring is the best season to look for migrants of all kinds, especially the beautiful wood-warblers, orioles, thrushes, and more. Walk past wetlands and through meadows and woodlands observing changes in bird species each week.

Preregistration is not required. Bring binoculars; beginners welcome. Free

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 27 @ 10:00 am – 10:45 am

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 27 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 27 @ 2:00 pm – 2:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 27 @ 3:00 pm – 3:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Lenox, MA–Spring Salamander & Frog Search @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Apr 27 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 5 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $6.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $4.00

Woodland salamanders and frogs spend their days under logs, stones and other objects, venturing out only in the cool moist of evenings. Join us as we search the woods and wetlands of Pleasant Valley for these fascinating animals and learn about their interesting lives. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or call (413) 637-0320

Apr
28
Sat
Monterey, MA–Retracing Native Histories on the Landscape @ The Bidwell House Museum
Apr 28 @ 10:00 am

A Colonial History Museum on the National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1750s

Before it officially opens for the season, visit the Bidwell House Museum for a special guided tour of the gardens and grounds with Board President and land-use expert Robert Hoogs. As you explore the Native American presence that pre-dated early settler history—this was not the “howling wilderness” often portrayed—you can consider how Mohicans lived on this land for centuries before and after the English settlers. Sitting on 192 acres, this tour will show you some of the 4 miles of forest trails and stone walls on the Bidwell grounds.

Monterey, MA–Retracing Native Histories on the Landscape–During Spring 2018 Artweek Festival @ The Bidwell House Museum
Apr 28 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Before it is officially open for the season, visit the Bidwell House Museum for a special guided tour of the gardens and grounds with board president and land-use expert Robert Hoogs. As you explore the Native American presence that pre-dated early settler history–this was not the “howling wilderness” often portrayed–you can consider how Mohicans lived on this land for centuries before and after the English settlers. Sitting on 192 acres, this tour will show you some of the 4 miles of forest trails along with stone walls and artifacts built on the Bidwell grounds by farmers in the 18th and 19th centuries. This special guided tour of the grounds will be a fascinating look at the land and how the Berkshire upland forest has been used and maintained for many centuries.

Presented by Highland Street Foundation and produced by the Boch Center, ArtWeek offers new ways to experience art, culture, and creativity. This year, Mass Cultural Council and the Massachusetts Office of Travel & Tourism have joined ArtWeek as Lead Champions in this unique opportunity to shine a spotlight on the state’s creative economy.

ArtWeek is an award-winning innovative festival featuring hundreds of unique and creative experiences that are hands-on, interactive or offer behind-the-scenes access to arts, culture, and the creative process. Now an annual statewide festival, ArtWeek was born in Boston in 2013 and recently expanded its footprint across the Commonwealth.

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 28 @ 10:00 am – 10:45 am

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 28 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Pittsfield, MA–Hancock Shaker Village: Inventing the Shaker Aesthetic–Industrial Photography, Museum Exhibitions, and American Modernism, 1923 -1939 @ Hancock Shaker Village
Apr 28 @ 2:00 pm

$15.00 – $25.00
Shaker Museum & Mount Lebanon and Hancock Shaker Village co-present this event

A preeminent photographer of the Shakers from 1923 until his death in 1939, William F. Winter, Jr. created an extensive body of modernist photographic images that allowed curators, collectors, writers, and other enthusiasts to claim the Northeast’s Shaker communities as vital American predecessors of modernism. In the last 20 years, a burgeoning literature has begun to analyze 20th-century representations of the Shakers. Born in Albany, New York, in 1899, Winter worked at General Electric as an industrial photographer where he fashioned Machine Age images of manufacturing equipment, products, and processes for corporate public relations use. By analyzing Winter’s oeuvre, exploring his relationships with museum administrators, and placing his images within their historical and institutional contexts, this talk explores the manner in which curators, journalists, and designers have used the idea of Shaker design to epitomize supposedly national traits of frugality, functionality, and simplicity.

William D. Moore is Director of the American & New England Studies Program at Boston University where he also serves as Associate Professor of American Material Culture in the Department of the History of Art & Architecture. He is the author of numerous publications concerning American artifacts, buildings, and landscapes, most notably Masonic Temples: Freemasonry, Ritual Architecture, and Masculine Archetypes. Formerlythe executive director of the Enfield Shaker Museum, he is currently completing a manuscript entitled Shaker Fever: America’s 20th Century Fascination with a Communitarian, Celibate Sect.
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Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 28 @ 2:00 pm – 2:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 28 @ 3:00 pm – 3:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Apr
29
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 29 @ 10:00 am – 10:45 am

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 29 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 29 @ 2:00 pm – 2:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Apr 29 @ 3:00 pm – 3:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

May
2
Wed
Lenox, MA–Birding with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
May 2 @ 7:00 am – 9:00 am

Wed, May 02, 9, 16, 23, 30

Free – Join Pleasant Valley’s Jonathan Pierce on a weekly bird walk past beaver wetlands and through woodlands looking for warblers, tanagers, orioles and more during the peak of the spring migration and nesting season. Preregistration is not required. Bring binoculars or call ahead to reserve a pair; beginners welcome. Sponsored by a grant from the Lenox Cultural Council.

Gt. Barrington, MA–Berkshire Birds Program at the GB Senior Center
May 2 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Join Great Barrington Land Conservancy birders, Sharon Siter and Christine Ward and warm up your birding skills for spring! We will present a Birding ID program that will include slides of common and rarer birds to been seen in Berkshire County, both at your feeder and in the field. Information on birding resources and guided birding walks will also be provided. We will also provide information other Great Barrington Land Conservancy resources for seniors, included easy walk and guided walks.

Please sign up at the Claire Teague Senior Center in Great Barrington(917 Main Street) or by emailing Christine@GBLand.org. This event is free and open to the public.

Lenox, MA–Evening at the Beaver Ponds with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
May 2 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

Members: Adult $6.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $4.00

Enjoy an evening searching for beavers and other wildlife that frequent our wildlife sanctuary ponds. Learn about the lives of beavers, their amazing recovery story, and how they continue to shape the landscape more than 80 years after their reintroduction to the area.
Preregistration is recommended but not required. Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

May
3
Thu
Gt. Barrington, MA–Guided Birding Walks at River Walk on Thursdays
May 3 @ 6:00 pm

also at 7:30 AM

River Walk is now an eBird hot spot!

River Walk is the perfect place for you to explore the birds of the Housatonic River corridor. Join Christine Ward, Sharon Siter, and Elia Del Molino for a morning or evening guided birding tour. Bring your binoculars and field guides. Support will be offered for beginning birders. More than 75 species of birds have been sited on River Walk in the past, including bald eagle, great blue heron, kingfisher, and flocks of cedar waxwing. Learn about techniques and tools to help you enjoy the many birds of Berkshire County.

Meet at the Upper River Walk entrance located in the St Peter’s parking lot on Dresser Ave. Contact Christine Ward: info@GBLands.org. Sponsored by Great Barrington Land Conservancy.

Pre-registration suggested: river@gbriverwalk.org

Lenox, Ma–Behind-the-Scenes with Author of “The Little Book of Feminist Saints” Julia Pierpont and Editor Caitlin McKenna @ The Mount
May 3 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

COST: $10 general; free for Mount members
Offering a behind-the-scenes look into the publishing world, join New York Times bestselling author Julia Pierpont alongside her editor Caitlin McKenna as they discuss Julia’s latest work The Little Book of Feminist Saints, a luminous work illustrated by artist Manjit Thapp. Together they match short biographies with stunning portraits of one hundred exceptional women throughout history—including:

Maya Angelou • Jane Austen • Rachel Carson • Shirley Chisholm • Marie Curie & Irène Joliot Curie • Isadora Duncan • Amelia Earhart • Artemisia Gentileschi • Grace Hopper • Dolores Huerta • Frida Kahlo • Billie Jean King • Audre Lorde • Wilma Mankiller • Toni Morrison • Michelle Obama • Sandra Day O’Connor • Sally Ride • Eleanor Roosevelt • Nina Simone • Gloria Steinem • Kanno Sugako • Harriet Tubman • Mae West • Virginia Woolf • Malala Yousafzai
==

May
5
Sat
Stockbridge, MA–Revisiting Indiantown: Stockbridge Mohican History Seminar @ Stockbridge Town Hall
May 5 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

 

 

LUNCH AND SELECT CULTURAL DEMONSTRATIONS ARE LIMITED IN SPACE AND REQUIRE PRE-REGISTRATION

Day’s Schedule :

9:00-1:00 PM Presenters on the topic of “Revisiting Indiantown,” the story of the Stockbridge Mohicans. Keynote by President Shannon Holsey (open to all)

1:00-2:00 PM Lunch (Free with pre-registration only)

2:00-5:00 PM Optional cultural demonstrations (with pre-registration only), and Main Street Walking Tours (open to all). The Mission House and Stockbridge Library Museum will be open during this time for special tours!

The afternoon offers choices of three special cultural demonstrations for one hour (2:00-3:00PM) coinciding with the open Walking Spaces are very limited for the cultural demonstrations.

Kent, CT–The Connecticut Antique Machinery Association Presents Our 14th Annual Spring Power-Up and Open House @ Conn. Antique Machinery Assoc.
May 5 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

 

Our 2018 Spring Power-Up will be our 14th Anniversary of this celebration to the re-opening of CAMA after a cold, snowy winter. This show has grown by leaps and bounds since its inception 14 years ago.

Northwestern Connecticut winters can be notoriously bad, so the Spring Power-Up will be a good chance to bid the cold weather goodbye. Unlike the Fall Festival, our Spring Power-Up will be a showcase of our own extensive collection of steam and internal combustion engines, tractors, the historic Cream Hill Agricultural School and the Connecticut Museum of Mining and Mineral Science.

That being said, either member or non-member outside exhibitors are welcome to bring their machinery and set up for the day. Show off that new purchase or that fresh restoration project.

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 5 @ 10:00 am – 10:45 am

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Pittsfield/Hancock, MA–WALK AND WONDER @ hancock shaker village
May 5 @ 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Join us on the Farm and Forest Trail for a guided family-friendly (and stroller-friendly) walk to explore the plants and creatures that live there. Included in admission/FREE to members

 

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 5 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 5 @ 2:00 pm – 2:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 5 @ 3:00 pm – 3:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

May
6
Sun
Kent, CT–The Connecticut Antique Machinery Association Presents Our 14th Annual Spring Power-Up and Open House @ Conn. Antique Machinery Assoc.
May 6 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

 

Our 2018 Spring Power-Up will be our 14th Anniversary of this celebration to the re-opening of CAMA after a cold, snowy winter. This show has grown by leaps and bounds since its inception 14 years ago.

Northwestern Connecticut winters can be notoriously bad, so the Spring Power-Up will be a good chance to bid the cold weather goodbye. Unlike the Fall Festival, our Spring Power-Up will be a showcase of our own extensive collection of steam and internal combustion engines, tractors, the historic Cream Hill Agricultural School and the Connecticut Museum of Mining and Mineral Science.

That being said, either member or non-member outside exhibitors are welcome to bring their machinery and set up for the day. Show off that new purchase or that fresh restoration project.

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 6 @ 10:00 am – 10:45 am

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 6 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 6 @ 2:00 pm – 2:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 6 @ 3:00 pm – 3:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

May
9
Wed
Lenox, MA–Birding with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
May 9 @ 7:00 am – 9:00 am

Wed, May 02, 9, 16, 23, 30

Free – Join Pleasant Valley’s Jonathan Pierce on a weekly bird walk past beaver wetlands and through woodlands looking for warblers, tanagers, orioles and more during the peak of the spring migration and nesting season. Preregistration is not required. Bring binoculars or call ahead to reserve a pair; beginners welcome. Sponsored by a grant from the Lenox Cultural Council.

May
10
Thu
Gt. Barrington, MA–Guided Birding Walks at River Walk on Thursdays
May 10 @ 6:00 pm

also at 7:30 AM

River Walk is now an eBird hot spot!

River Walk is the perfect place for you to explore the birds of the Housatonic River corridor. Join Christine Ward, Sharon Siter, and Elia Del Molino for a morning or evening guided birding tour. Bring your binoculars and field guides. Support will be offered for beginning birders. More than 75 species of birds have been sited on River Walk in the past, including bald eagle, great blue heron, kingfisher, and flocks of cedar waxwing. Learn about techniques and tools to help you enjoy the many birds of Berkshire County.

Meet at the Upper River Walk entrance located in the St Peter’s parking lot on Dresser Ave. Contact Christine Ward: info@GBLands.org. Sponsored by Great Barrington Land Conservancy.

Pre-registration suggested: river@gbriverwalk.org

May
12
Sat
Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 12 @ 10:00 am – 10:45 am

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 12 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 12 @ 2:00 pm – 2:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 12 @ 3:00 pm – 3:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

May
13
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 13 @ 10:00 am – 10:45 am

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 13 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 13 @ 2:00 pm – 2:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Wildflower Festival guided tour @ Bartholomew's Cobble
May 13 @ 3:00 pm – 3:45 pm

Come to Bartholomew’s Cobble every Saturday and Sunday from April 21st-> May 13th for guided tours of our Ledges Trail to learn about our amazing wildflowers. Participants will learn the different flowers that are blooming, the insects that pollinate them and what makes them so unique.

Tours will leave from the Visitor’s Center at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm and will last about 45 minutes. Spring wildflowers are extremely unique and have extremely short bloom times. Because of this, flowers that will be blooming at the beginning of the festival may not be in bloom by the end, and visitor’s are encouraged to visit the Cobble multiple times during the festival to see as much as possible.

Private tours are available for groups of 6 or more during the week with pre-registration. If you are calling for more information during normal business hours call 413-298-3239 x 3013, during the weekend please call 413-299-8600.

Member Adult: $5; Member Child: FREE;
Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: FREE;

Telephone: 413.229.8600
E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

May
16
Wed
Lenox, MA–Birding with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
May 16 @ 7:00 am – 9:00 am

Wed, May 02, 9, 16, 23, 30

Free – Join Pleasant Valley’s Jonathan Pierce on a weekly bird walk past beaver wetlands and through woodlands looking for warblers, tanagers, orioles and more during the peak of the spring migration and nesting season. Preregistration is not required. Bring binoculars or call ahead to reserve a pair; beginners welcome. Sponsored by a grant from the Lenox Cultural Council.

May
17
Thu
Gt. Barrington, MA–Guided Birding Walks at River Walk on Thursdays
May 17 @ 6:00 pm

also at 7:30 AM

River Walk is now an eBird hot spot!

River Walk is the perfect place for you to explore the birds of the Housatonic River corridor. Join Christine Ward, Sharon Siter, and Elia Del Molino for a morning or evening guided birding tour. Bring your binoculars and field guides. Support will be offered for beginning birders. More than 75 species of birds have been sited on River Walk in the past, including bald eagle, great blue heron, kingfisher, and flocks of cedar waxwing. Learn about techniques and tools to help you enjoy the many birds of Berkshire County.

Meet at the Upper River Walk entrance located in the St Peter’s parking lot on Dresser Ave. Contact Christine Ward: info@GBLands.org. Sponsored by Great Barrington Land Conservancy.

Pre-registration suggested: river@gbriverwalk.org

May
19
Sat
Lenox, MA–Spring Wildflower Walk @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
May 19 @ 10:00 am – 12:30 pm

Instructor: Linda Cysz – Naturalist
Members: $6.00 Nonmembers: $8.00
Search for meadow and woodland wildflowers and other signs of spring at our sanctuaries. We will take a leisurely walk and search for early blooming flowers. We’ll learn to use guidebooks and apps to look up plants we discover along the way. Bring trail snacks, curiosity, and a hand lens if you have one.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Sheffield, MA–Home Sweet Home at the Ashley House – The Art of the Garden: Inspiration Grows Here @ ashley house
May 19 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Guided Tours on the hour at 10 am, 11 am, 12 noon, 1 pm, 2 pm, 3 pm

Celebrate The Trustees’ public gardens, a living documentary of Massachusetts horticulture and design traditions. Many of these gardens are part of the landscapes of Trustees historic sites, the former homes of historical figures, literati, titans of industry, political leaders, artists and more and span a 300-year timeline from the Colonial Era to the Modern Movement.

Come experience all the beauty, history, and unique stories contained within each home, as well as the exquisitely designed gardens and stunning natural landscapes. Special tours, gardening and family-friendly activities and refreshments will be offered.

Take a guided tour of this pre-Revolutionary war home and learn about the home and its owners, and how an enslaved African-American woman sued for and won her freedom 80 years before the Emancipation Proclamation.

413.298.3239 x3016
mmoulton@thetrustees.org

May
23
Wed
Lenox, MA–Birding with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
May 23 @ 7:00 am – 9:00 am

Wed, May 02, 9, 16, 23, 30

Free – Join Pleasant Valley’s Jonathan Pierce on a weekly bird walk past beaver wetlands and through woodlands looking for warblers, tanagers, orioles and more during the peak of the spring migration and nesting season. Preregistration is not required. Bring binoculars or call ahead to reserve a pair; beginners welcome. Sponsored by a grant from the Lenox Cultural Council.

May
24
Thu
Gt. Barrington, MA–Guided Birding Walks at River Walk on Thursdays
May 24 @ 6:00 pm

also at 7:30 AM

River Walk is now an eBird hot spot!

River Walk is the perfect place for you to explore the birds of the Housatonic River corridor. Join Christine Ward, Sharon Siter, and Elia Del Molino for a morning or evening guided birding tour. Bring your binoculars and field guides. Support will be offered for beginning birders. More than 75 species of birds have been sited on River Walk in the past, including bald eagle, great blue heron, kingfisher, and flocks of cedar waxwing. Learn about techniques and tools to help you enjoy the many birds of Berkshire County.

Meet at the Upper River Walk entrance located in the St Peter’s parking lot on Dresser Ave. Contact Christine Ward: info@GBLands.org. Sponsored by Great Barrington Land Conservancy.

Pre-registration suggested: river@gbriverwalk.org

May
26
Sat
Gt. Barrington, MA–Waterfowl and Wood Warblers with Mass Audubon @ Myrin Preserve
May 26 @ 7:00 am – 9:00 am

Instructor: Dale Abrams – Education Coordinator
Members: $8.00 Nonmembers: $12.00
Catch the peak of spring migration in Monument Valley. We will listen and look for waterfowl, warblers, flycatchers, and other birds around the beaver ponds and woodland trails. This trip involves easy walking on relatively level trails. Directions provided upon registration.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
May 26 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

May
27
Sun
Concert and Opening Celebration—A Silver Dagger: Exploring Women’s History Through Folksongs with Diane Taraz @ The Bidwell House Museum
May 27 @ 3:00 pm

A Colonial History Museum–a National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1750s

Passed down for generations, folk songs show centuries of attitudes and beliefs that have fascinating echoes in our lives today. Through music that brims with energy and humor, determination and despair, Diane looks at ordinary people in centuries past, finding in old songs many clues to the inner lives of people in Europe and America from about 1500 to 1850. Women left few written records, but we can learn much about them through the music they used to speed their work, lift their spirits, or ease an aching heart. With a sparkling voice and wry humor, Diane performs songs of love, childbirth, marriage and adventure in traditional dress and accompanies her singing with lap dulcimer and English guitar (the type of instrument played by women back then). She often sings with voice alone, the most authentic style, exploring the joys and sorrows of a world lit only by fire.

A reception to celebrate the end of a successful capital campaign and the newly completed restoration of the house will follow the concert. Refreshments will be served. No charge but donations are welcome. Please note: the museum is closed for tours this day.

May
30
Wed
Lenox, MA–Birding with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
May 30 @ 7:00 am – 9:00 am

Wed, May 02, 9, 16, 23, 30

Free – Join Pleasant Valley’s Jonathan Pierce on a weekly bird walk past beaver wetlands and through woodlands looking for warblers, tanagers, orioles and more during the peak of the spring migration and nesting season. Preregistration is not required. Bring binoculars or call ahead to reserve a pair; beginners welcome. Sponsored by a grant from the Lenox Cultural Council.

May
31
Thu
Gt. Barrington, MA–Guided Birding Walks at River Walk on Thursdays
May 31 @ 6:00 pm

also at 7:30 AM

River Walk is now an eBird hot spot!

River Walk is the perfect place for you to explore the birds of the Housatonic River corridor. Join Christine Ward, Sharon Siter, and Elia Del Molino for a morning or evening guided birding tour. Bring your binoculars and field guides. Support will be offered for beginning birders. More than 75 species of birds have been sited on River Walk in the past, including bald eagle, great blue heron, kingfisher, and flocks of cedar waxwing. Learn about techniques and tools to help you enjoy the many birds of Berkshire County.

Meet at the Upper River Walk entrance located in the St Peter’s parking lot on Dresser Ave. Contact Christine Ward: info@GBLands.org. Sponsored by Great Barrington Land Conservancy.

Pre-registration suggested: river@gbriverwalk.org

Jun
2
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jun 2 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Tyringham, MA–History Talk Sponsored by the Bidwell House Museum—The Silver Mountain: The Forgotten Story of the Most Extraordinary Place in all of Colonial America @ Tyringham Union Church
Jun 2 @ 10:00 am

A Colonial History Museum–a National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1750s

A talk by John Demos, Samuel Knight Professor of American History Emeritus at Yale University and award-winning author. Listen as Professor Demos describes the remarkable history of Potosi during its heyday as the world’s greatest silver mine and fulcrum of the Spanish colonial empire. Founded in what is today southern Bolivia during the mid-16th century, Potosi quickly rose to become by far the largest human community in the Western Hemisphere, a source of wealth that transformed the international economy, and, not least, the mother of all boom towns. But it was, at the same time, virtually genocidal for the indigenous population. Thus it stands, in all respects, as an epitome of the massively consequential invasion of the New World by the Old.

Held at, Main Road, Tyringham.

Members: $10. Non-members: $15. 10 a.m.

Jun
3
Sun
Monterey, MA–Birding Beyond Your Backyard @ The Bidwell House Museum
Jun 3 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am

413-528-6888
bidwellhouse@gmail.com
www.bidwellhousemuseum.org

A Colonial History Museum–a National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1750s

Join Doug Bruce and Tom Ryan. Designed for beginning birders who would like to expand their birding knowledge, this talk and walk will help take you from feeder birds (blue jays, chickadees) to the birds of field and forest. Can’t tell a robin from a crow? No shame—we’ll show you how we do it. This walk is all about birds of the upland forest: we’ll walk the trails on the Bidwell House Museum’s 190+ acres of beautiful hemlock-hardwood forest. Footing is good; very moderate elevation changes. Wear good shoes; bring water and a snack.

Jun
9
Sat
Pittsfield/Hancock, MA–1st Annual NORTHEAST FIDDLERS’ CONVENTION with Bill & the Belles and Nils Fredland @ Hancock Shaker Village
Jun 9 all-day

1st Annual NORTHEAST FIDDLERS’ CONVENTION with Bill & the Belles and Nils Fredland

cost  $15.00 – $100.00
Oldtone and Hancock Shaker Village present a traditionally inspired old-time music gathering featuring workshops led by Bill & the Belles, Tara Linhardt, and Nils Fredland, an open jam in the historic Round Stone Barn, a fiddle and banjo contest and more jamming. We’ll top off the night in the 1910 Barn with a square dance with live music from Bill and the Belles, one of the most popular roots bands on the scene today, called by Nils Fredland. Local food vendors and craft beer available all day.

TICKETS
Day (10am-7pm) Advance $20
Eve (7pm-midnight) Advance $20
All access (10am – midnight) Advance $35
High Note: includes all access, plus curator tour of village (including early 19th century Shaker music sheet in the archives), and private midnight entrance to Silo Songs, a new site-specific sound art installation created by Grammy-award winning composer Brad Wells. $100 Limited availability
Children 12 and younger FREE. Teens 13-17 $15 for either the day or the night. $25 for all access.

Day, All access, and High Note tickets include: access to 20 historic buildings and hiking trails at Hancock Shaker Village, a 750-acre property dating back to 1790. Talk, tours, and demonstrations, 10am-4pm, include: an introduction to the Shakers talk, a farm and garden tour, a water turbine demonstration, a Shaker music and dance demonstration, a tour of the historic Round Stone Barn, blacksmith demonstrations, a Shaker cooking demonstration, and a medicinal herb garden talk.

Hancock Shaker Village
GPS: 34 Lebanon Mountain Rd., Hancock, MA 01237 or enter 1843 W. Housatonic St., Pittsfield, MA 01201 then proceed 1/2 mile further West on Rt. 20 to the parking lot.
==========

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jun 9 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Tyringham, MA–History Talk Sponsored by the Bidwell House Museum:  Ministers, Merchants and River Gods: The Williamses of Western Massachusetts, 1680-1780 @ Tyringham Union Church
Jun 9 @ 10:00 am

A Colonial History Museum–a National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1750s

A talk by Kevin Sweeney, Professor Emeritus of History and American Studies at Amherst College. Noteworthy and notorious, the Williamses of Deerfield and Stockbridge were the most prominent of the powerful eighteenth-century families that came to be known as the River Gods. The story of the Williams clan’s rise and fall was shaped by and helped shape the western region’s relations with Native peoples, military establishment, distinctive religious traditions, and critical political ties to Boston.

Members: $10. Non-members: $15.

Jun
16
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jun 16 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Monterey, MA–Archaeology on the Bidwell House Grounds @ The Bidwell House Museum
Jun 16 @ 10:00 am

A Colonial History Museum–a National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1750s

What artifacts were found outside the Reverend’s door and what do they tell us about the lives of the former residents of the house? Join University of Massachusetts Archaeologist Kerry Lynch for a walk and talk as she reports on the August 2017 archaeological dig at the Museum, the types of items that were found and their significance to the 18th, 19th and 20th century residents of the Bidwell House.

Members: $10. Non-members: $15.

Monterey, MA–A Guided Walk: Retracing Native Histories on the Landscape @ The Bidwell House Museum
Jun 16 @ 1:00 pm

A Colonial History Museum–a National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1750s

Join guide Rob Hoogs to explore a new interpretive trail as you retrace the steps of the Native Americans—specifically the local Stockbridge Band of the Mohican Tribe—who lived and hunted in this area for thousands of years.

Adults $15, Seniors $10 and children are free. This fee includes a guided- tour of the house either before or after the guided walk. Call the Museum to pre-register, 413-528-6888.

Jun
23
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jun 23 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Jun
30
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jun 30 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Tyringham, MA–Bidwell House Museum History Talk: The Sun Ever Shines on Them–The Global Reach of William and Jemima Bidwell Partridge’s Family @ Tyringham Union Church
Jun 30 @ 10:00 am

A talk by Bidwell descendant, Russ Taylor. William Partridge’s brother, Dr. Oliver Partridge of Stockbridge, marveled that, with the exception of 40 minutes each day, the sun shone somewhere on a member of William and Jemima’s family. From missions in the Middle East and the Sandwich Islands to the establishment of religious communities in the Midwest, the impact of some of Rev. Adonijah’s grandchildren has been vast … and enduring.
Members: $10. Non-members: $15.

Jul
1
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 1 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Jul
7
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 7 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Jul
8
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Jul
14
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 14 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Jul
15
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Jul
21
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 21 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Tyringham, MA–Bidwell House History Talk- Frenemies: Relationships between European colonists and Mohicans in 18th Century New England @ Tyringham Union Church
Jul 21 @ 10:00 am

Join Judy Putnam Hartley, Stockbridge Munsee Mohican tribal elder, as she discusses the “friendly” Indians who encountered and fed  Henry Hudson in 1609. By the time the Mohicans moved to Stockbridge in the 1730s they had a history of navigating European interactions. The Mohicans willingly served alongside the Colonists in wartime, yet the failure of English-Mohican shared governance in Stockbridge and unsatisfactory court petitions regarding land disputes repeatedly called into question whether the relationship was one of friends, enemies or both? Ms. Hartley will share some of her ancestors’ own words in reflecting on these encounters.

Members: $10. Non-members: $15.

Monterey, MA–A Guided Walk: Retracing Native Histories on the Landscape @ The Bidwell House Museum
Jul 21 @ 1:00 pm

Join guide Rob Hoogs to explore a new interpretive trail as you retrace the steps of the Native Americans—specifically the local Stockbridge Band of the Mohican Tribe—who lived and hunted in this area for thousands of years. Adults $15, Seniors $8 and children are free. This fee includes a guided house tour either before or after the guided walk

Call the Museum to pre-register, 413-528-6888.

A Colonial History Museum–a National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1750s

 

==

Jul
22
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Jul
28
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 28 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Lenox, Ma–Paddling on the Housatonic River:  In Search of Turtles
Jul 28 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
Lenox, Ma–Paddling on the Housatonic River:  In Search of Turtles

Trip Length: 3 – 4 miles Level: Beginner (6+yrs)

Paddle downstream from Woods Pond and back enjoying the Housatonic River as we search for painted and other turtle species basking along the river’s edge and learn about these ancient reptiles that are struggling to maintain their populations. This paddle trip is suitable for families with children 6 yrs and older.

Registration is required, space is limited. Call 413-298-7024
Canoes and equipment provided or register to bring your own boat.
Trip information provided upon completion of registration.

In partnership with: THE HOUSATONIC HERITAGE AREA

====

Get on the river! The best way to enjoy this gorgeous body of water is through a paddling trip.  Housatonic River paddle trips are suitable for most skill levels (see individual descriptions) and are an ideal way to see the river.

CALL 413-298-7024 TO REGISTER or EMAIL
Registration is required as space is limited. Canoes and equipment provided. Trip information provided upon completion of registration.
=====

Jul
29
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Aug
4
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 4 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
5
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Aug 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Aug
11
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 11 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
12
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Aug 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Aug
18
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 18 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
19
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Aug 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Aug
25
Sat
Gt. Barrington, MA– Family Paddling Trip on the Housatonic River
Aug 25 @ 9:00 am – 3:00 pm
Gt. Barrington, MA-- Family Paddling Trip on the Housatonic River

Get on the river! The best way to enjoy this gorgeous body of water is through a paddling trip. Housatonic River paddle trips are suitable for most skill levels (see individual descriptions) and are an ideal way to see the river.

CALL 413-298-7024 TO REGISTER or EMAIL– PADDLE@HVATODAY.ORG
Registration is required as space is limited. Canoes and equipment provided. Trip information provided upon completion of registration.
=====

Trip Length: 6.6 miles Level: Beginner (10+yrs)

Get your family out for a day of river exploration! We’ll paddle from Bridge Street, Great Barrington to the Covered Bridge in Sheffield stopping for lunch on a sandbar where the Green River joins the Housatonic. This meandering stretch of the Housatonic River is mostly calm with occasional quickwater and downed trees to negotiate. Suitable for families with children 10+yrs.

Registration is required, space is limited. Call 413-298-7024
Canoes and equipment provided or register to bring your own boat.
Trip information provided upon completion of registration.

In partnership with: THE HOUSATONIC HERITAGE AREA

 

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 25 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Monterey, MA–Retracing Native Histories on the Landscape – Guided Walk @ The Bidwell House Museum
Aug 25 @ 1:00 pm

Join guide Rob Hoogs to explore a new interpretive trail as you retrace the steps of the Native Americans—specifically the local Stockbridge Band of the Mohican Tribe—who lived and hunted in this area for thousands of years.

Adults $15, Seniors $8 and children are free. This fee includes a guided house tour either before or after the guided walk. Call the Museum to pre-register, 413-528-6888.

A Colonial History Museum–a National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1750s

Aug
26
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Aug 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Sep
1
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Sep 1 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Sep
8
Sat
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 80 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTRY, CT
Sep 8 all-day