Events

Event Calendar for The Berkshires and Litchfield County

Sep
22
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 22 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
23
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 23 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
24
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 24 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
25
Sat
Lee/Becket, MA–Birding at Basin Pond Preserve (RSVP Required), with Berkshire Natural Resources Council
Sep 25 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am

Please RSVP to Noah at noah@thebeatnews.org.
(Up to 6 participants)
Difficulty: Moderate (easy pace, moderate elevation change)

Description: Join BNRC and BEAT on a moderate walk along the Basin Pond trails. Noah, Stewardship Manager with the Berkshire Environmental Action Team, will guide the group in learning about bird song, behavior, and habitat. We’ll also discuss some favorite field guides and apps! Please be aware that birding walks are slower paced than a hike. Wear sturdy footwear, bring water, a snack and binoculars if you have them. We will have a few to distribute for the walk. The outlined safety protocols must be followed.

Directions to Basin Pond Trailhead, Lee:
From Lee: Take Route 20 east past the Outlets. After approximately 4 miles turn left onto Becket Road. Parking will be on your left after a third of a mile.

From Great Barrington: Take Route 7 north into Stockbridge. Turn onto Route 102 heading east into Lee. After passing Big Y, turn right onto Route 20 heading east. After approximately 4 miles turn left onto Becket Road. Parking will be on your left after a third of a mile.

From Pittsfield: Take Route 20 south into Lee. From Lee, stay on Route 20 heading east, past the Mass Turnpike, toward Becket. After 4 miles, turn left onto Becket Road and drive 1/3 mile to parking area on left.

Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 25 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
26
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 26 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
27
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 27 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
28
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 28 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
29
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 29 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Sep
30
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Sep 30 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
1
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 1 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
2
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 2 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

New Milford, CT–RiverFest
Oct 2 @ 11:00 am – 9:30 pm

Throughout New Milford’s history the Housatonic River and its waterfront have played a key role in residents’ lives.

Revitalizing the riverfront is the ambitious goal of a long-term plan to enhance our quality of life and the town’s economic vitality.

RiverFest, organized by the town’s Riverfront  Revitalization Committee and the Mayor’s office, highlights our riverfront area and its connections to Downtown.

RiverFest is a celebration of community and a time to gather with friends and family.  Taking place along the banks of Housatonic River in New Milford, CT – gateway to Litchfield County –and our historic Downtown Village Center, with its popular restaurants and diverse retail offerings, it will highlight the heart of our community. Together Downtown and the Riverfront are envisioned as a vibrant hub of commerce, recreation, entertainment and residential life by the Riverfront Revitalization Committee, organizers of this exciting event. 

Admission is free.  Attractions include:

  • Live music and entertainment

  • Food trucks and local food vendors

  • Beer and Wine Garden

  • Arts and crafts vendors

  • Environmental education

  • Children’s activities

  • Guided walks along the envisioned One-Mile “Down to the River” walk

Oct
3
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 3 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

New Milford, CT–RiverFest
Oct 3 @ 11:00 am – 9:30 pm

Throughout New Milford’s history the Housatonic River and its waterfront have played a key role in residents’ lives.

Revitalizing the riverfront is the ambitious goal of a long-term plan to enhance our quality of life and the town’s economic vitality.

RiverFest, organized by the town’s Riverfront  Revitalization Committee and the Mayor’s office, highlights our riverfront area and its connections to Downtown.

RiverFest is a celebration of community and a time to gather with friends and family.  Taking place along the banks of Housatonic River in New Milford, CT – gateway to Litchfield County –and our historic Downtown Village Center, with its popular restaurants and diverse retail offerings, it will highlight the heart of our community. Together Downtown and the Riverfront are envisioned as a vibrant hub of commerce, recreation, entertainment and residential life by the Riverfront Revitalization Committee, organizers of this exciting event. 

Admission is free.  Attractions include:

  • Live music and entertainment

  • Food trucks and local food vendors

  • Beer and Wine Garden

  • Arts and crafts vendors

  • Environmental education

  • Children’s activities

  • Guided walks along the envisioned One-Mile “Down to the River” walk

Oct
4
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 4 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
5
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 5 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
6
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 6 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
7
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 7 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
8
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 8 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
9
Sat
Norfolk, CT–Annual “Tour de Forest” Bike Ride @ Great Mountain Forest @ Great Mountain Forest
Oct 9 @ 10:00 am

Please join us to bike historic Norfolk to support the Norfolk Rails 2 Trails!

This 13-mile route is a fun recreational ride on a mix of dirt and paved roads. Enjoy views of lakes, meadows, and historic homes before heading into the majestic Great Mountain Forest. Take a break at any—or all—of the 8 info stops along the route loaded with fun facts about the forest and local railroad history.

All ages are welcome! Join in solo, with friends, or plan a family ride – children under 12 are free. Registration begins at 8:30am; Start riding at 10am on Saturday 10/9.
REGISTER: http://www.bikereg.com/norfolk-ct-tour-de-forest

Tickets are $40 for Adults; $20/for Teens. Children 12 and under are Free.      Phone: 860-384-1214

Register on-line or day of the event at 70 Golf Drive, Norfolk, CT 06058

Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 9 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
10
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 10 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
11
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 11 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
12
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 12 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
13
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 13 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
14
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 14 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
15
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 15 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
16
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 16 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
17
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 17 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
18
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 18 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
19
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 19 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
20
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 20 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
21
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 21 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
22
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 22 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
23
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 23 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
24
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 24 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
25
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 25 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
26
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 26 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
27
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 27 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
28
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 28 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
29
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 29 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
30
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 30 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Oct
31
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Oct 31 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
1
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 1 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
2
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 2 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
3
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 3 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
4
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 4 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
5
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 5 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
6
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 6 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
7
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 7 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
8
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 8 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
9
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 9 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
10
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 10 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
11
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 11 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
12
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 12 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
13
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 13 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
14
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 14 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
15
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 15 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
16
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 16 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
17
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 17 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
18
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 18 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
19
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 19 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
20
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 20 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
21
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 21 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
22
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 22 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
23
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 23 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
24
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 24 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
25
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 25 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
26
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 26 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
27
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 27 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
28
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 28 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
29
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 29 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Nov
30
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Nov 30 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
1
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 1 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
2
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 2 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
3
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 3 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
4
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 4 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
5
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 5 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
6
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 6 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
7
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 7 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
8
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 8 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
9
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 9 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
10
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 10 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
11
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 11 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
12
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 12 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
13
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 13 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
14
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 14 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
15
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 15 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
16
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 16 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
17
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 17 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
18
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 18 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
19
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 19 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
20
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 20 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
21
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 21 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
22
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 22 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
23
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 23 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
24
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 24 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
25
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 25 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.

Dec
26
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–“Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still” Exhibit @ Berkshire Museum
Dec 26 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

On View  through January 9, 2022   from 10 – 5 pm

“We once called this land home and while forced removal may have physically moved us, our hearts remain. Muh-he-con-ne-ok: The People of the Waters That Are Never Still showcases the history of the Stockbridge-Munsee Communities past, present, and future.”

Following the symbolic pathway of water throughout the exhibition, visitors will develop new insights into the history and culture of this Berkshire County Indigenous community through objects from the Berkshire Museum collection and those of partner institutions, contemporary oral histories and historical profiles of members of the Stockbridge-Munsee Community, timelines, and more. As they travel through the galleries, museum patrons will trace the journey of this region’s first residents from their lands that stretched from the Hudson River Valley to Berkshire County, through forced removal from these lands by white colonizers, to their current home in Wisconsin. Along the way, visitors will explore historical and current-day topics, discover actions they can take to be better allies to Indigenous people worldwide, and unlearn harmful misconceptions and stereotypes.

About the Curator–The Exhibit is curated by Heather Bruegl, Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge-Munsee Community. A member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendent Stockbridge Munsee.

Fulfilling Our Commitments to the Community–The Exhibit is just one small step in the Berkshire Museum’s efforts to fulfill its commitment to the Berkshire community to join with organizations engaged in the fight against racism, develop programming that amplifies the voices, works, and experiences of under-represented populations, and make the museum a place where people of all backgrounds feel welcomed and included. The museum continues efforts to reckon with the provenance of its collections and work with Indigenous communities to return sacred and stolen items and right the wrongs of the past.

Presented in partnership with the Stockbridge-Munsee Community and the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area.