Events

Event Calendar for The Berkshires and Litchfield County

Jun
26
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jun 26 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Jun
30
Wed
Lenox, MA–Firefly Watch with Pleasant Valley Audubon staff @ Canoe Meadows Wildlife Sanctuary
Jun 30 @ 8:00 am – 9:30 am

Location: Canoe Meadows Wildlife Sanctuary, Pittsfield, MA
Instructors: Zach Adams – Teacher Naturalist, Berkshires; Dale Abrams – Education Manager and Teacher Naturalist, Berkshires
Audience: Family(suitable for children 5 & up)
Members: Adult $12.00, Child $8.00
Nonmembers: Adult $14.00, Child $10.00

Experience a magical summer light show, and help us track firefly numbers and diversity through the Firefly Watch program. Learn about fireflies and how best to view or gently catch and release these mystical glowing lights of summer! We’ll take an evening walk in the meadows for firefly viewing while keeping our eyes open for the stars, planets, and twilight birds and mammals!

Directions to the meeting place will be provided upon regisrtation.

Instructions and Directions: PLEASE NOTE: This program will be conducted in accordance with current Municipal, State, and Mass Audubon Covid-19 protocols. Groups are limited to 11 preregistered participants, we cannot accommodate walk-ins. Participants are required to wear a face covering and follow social distancing guidelines. A detailed confirmation letter will be emailed 24 hours before the program.

Registration is required.

For more information, contact:
Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
berkshires@massaudubon.org

Jul
3
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 3 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Jul
10
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 10 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Jul
11
Sun
Sharon, CT: A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM @ Sharon Playhouse
Jul 11 @ 11:00 am

Sunday, July 11 -11 am & 3 pm

​A feuding fairy King and Queen of the forest cross paths with four runaway lovers and a troupe of actors trying to rehearse a play. This groovy adaptation is set in the United States in the 1960s, and not only includes love triangles, mistaken identities, and magical transformations, but also popular songs from the 60s, like “My Girl,” “Do You Believe In Magic,” and “R-E-S-P-E-C-T!”

Administration: 860-364-7469

Jul
17
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 17 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Jul
18
Sun
Sharon, CT: SEUSSICAL KIDS @ Sharon Playhouse
Jul 18 @ 12:00 pm

Horton the Elephant, the Cat in the Hat and all of your favorite Dr. Seuss characters spring to life onstage in Seussical KIDS.

Transporting audiences from the Jungle of Nool to the Circus McGurkus, the Cat in the Hat, our narrator, tells the story of Horton, an elephant who discovers a speck of dust containing tiny people called the Whos, including Jojo, a Who child, who gets in trouble for thinking too many “thinks.” Horton’s challenge is twofold — not only must he protect the Whos from a world of naysayers and dangers, but he must also guard an abandoned egg that’s been left in his care by the irresponsible Mayzie La Bird. Although Horton faces ridicule, danger, kidnapping and a trial, the intrepid Gertrude McFuzz never loses faith in him. Ultimately, the powers of friendship, loyalty, family and community are challenged and emerge triumphant!

Administration: 860-364-7469

Jul
21
Wed
Sharon, CT: FROZEN JR. @ Sharon Playhouse
Jul 21 @ 7:00 pm

Saturday, July 31 – 7 pm and  Sunday, Aug 1 – 12 pm

Based on the 2018 Broadway musical, Disney’s FROZEN JR. brings Elsa, Anna, an the magical land of Arendelle to life, onstage. The show features all of the memorable songs from the animated film, including the Oscar Winning song “LET IT GO” with music and lyrics by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez, plus five new songs written for the Broadway production.
A story of true love and acceptance between sisters, Frozen JR. expands upon the emotional relationship and journey between Princesses Anna and Elsa. When faced with danger, the two discover their hidden potential and the powerful bond of sisterhood. With a cast of beloved characters and loaded with magic, adventure, and plenty of humor, Frozen JR. is sure to thaw even the coldest heart!

Administration: 860-364-7469

Jul
24
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 24 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Jul
31
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 31 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
1
Sun
Sharon, CT: FROZEN JR. @ Sharon Playhouse
Aug 1 @ 12:00 pm

Saturday, July 31 – 7 pm and  Sunday, Aug 1 – 12 pm

Based on the 2018 Broadway musical, Disney’s FROZEN JR. brings Elsa, Anna, an the magical land of Arendelle to life, onstage. The show features all of the memorable songs from the animated film, including the Oscar Winning song “LET IT GO” with music and lyrics by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez, plus five new songs written for the Broadway production.
A story of true love and acceptance between sisters, Frozen JR. expands upon the emotional relationship and journey between Princesses Anna and Elsa. When faced with danger, the two discover their hidden potential and the powerful bond of sisterhood. With a cast of beloved characters and loaded with magic, adventure, and plenty of humor, Frozen JR. is sure to thaw even the coldest heart!

Administration: 860-364-7469

Aug
7
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 7 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
14
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 14 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
21
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 21 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
22
Sun
Sharon, CT: SEUSSICAL KIDS @ Sharon Playhouse
Aug 22 @ 12:00 pm

Horton the Elephant, the Cat in the Hat and all of your favorite Dr. Seuss characters spring to life onstage in Seussical KIDS.

​Transporting audiences from the Jungle of Nool to the Circus McGurkus, the Cat in the Hat, our narrator, tells the story of Horton, an elephant who discovers a speck of dust containing tiny people called the Whos, including Jojo, a Who child, who gets in trouble for thinking too many “thinks.” Horton’s challenge is twofold — not only must he protect the Whos from a world of naysayers and dangers, but he must also guard an abandoned egg that’s been left in his care by the irresponsible Mayzie La Bird. Although Horton faces ridicule, danger, kidnapping and a trial, the intrepid Gertrude McFuzz never loses faith in him. Ultimately, the powers of friendship, loyalty, family and community are challenged and emerge triumphant!

Administration: 860-364-7469

Aug
28
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 28 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Sep
4
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Sep 4 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Sep
11
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Sep 11 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.