Events

Jun
20
Wed
Lanesborough/Adams, MA–Free Public Program: Summit Nature Talk and Walk (Family Fun, Nature) @ Bascom Lodge-Atop Mount Greylock
Jun 20 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Aimee Gelinas on plant identification.

THIS IS A “FREE” PUBLIC PROGRAMMING EVENT OFFERED IN COLLABORATION WITH THE UPPER HOUSATONIC VALLEY NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA.

THIS FREE EVENT IS FOLLOWED AT 7 PM, BY AN OPTIONAL PRIX FIXE DINNER MENU that CHANGES NIGHTLY. (ONE SEATING ONLY). RESERVATIONS REQUESTED.
THE KITCHEN AT BASCOM LODGE IS COMMITTED TO PROVIDING FRESH, HAND-MADE FOOD, CRAFTED FROM INGREDIENTS PURCHASED FROM LOCAL, FAMILY OWNED FARMS.

CALL: 413-743-1591, EMAIL US AT: MAIL@BASCOMLODGE.NET, OR CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR EACH EVENING’S MENU

AT AN ELEVATION OF 3,491 FEET, BASCOM LODGE AT THE SUMMIT OF MOUNT GREYLOCK DOMINATES THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE; AFFORDING PARK VISTAS OF FOUR STATES AND FIVE MOUNTAIN RANGES. LOCATED IN THE HEART OF BERKSHIRE COUNTY, THE LODGE IS A RUSTIC ARTS AND CRAFTS MOUNTAIN LODGE BUILT IN THE 1930’S BY VOLUNTEERS FROM THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS. CONSTRUCTED OF LOCAL STONE AND OLD GROWTH RED SPRUCE TIMBERS, THE LODGE WAS DESIGNED IN AN ARCHITECTURAL STYLE THAT WOULD LATER BECOME THE BLUEPRINT FOR AMERICA’S NATIONAL PARKS. NESTLED ON THE SUMMIT OF MT. GREYLOCK, THE STATE’S HIGHEST MOUNTAIN, THE LODGE IS THE CENTERPIECE OF A 12,500 ACRE WILDERNESS PARK.

FROM RT 7, DRIVE TO LANESBOROUGH AND WATCH FOR THE MOUNT GREYLOCK RESERVATION AND VISITOR CENTER SIGNS (2 MILES NORTH OF LANESBORO TOWN LINE). TURN ONTO NORTH MAIN STREET, THEN BEAR RIGHT ONTO QUARRY ROAD, THEN BEAR LEFT ONTO ROCKWELL ROAD AND FOLLOW MOUNT GREYLOCK/BASCOM LODGE SIGNS FOR 9 MILES THROUGH THE FOREST TO THE SUMMIT.

413-743-1591, www.bascomlodge.net

Jun
23
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jun 23 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Jun
25
Mon
Pittsfield, MA–Poets Creating Conversation: Working in America @ Berkshire Museum
Jun 25 @ 7:00 pm

For this event, the poet’s challenge is to use their art to explore and share personal stories centered around working in America – the challenges, triumphs and realities – from work we love to work that doesn’t love us back. Information for poets interested in sharing their work

“Work is about a search for daily meaning as well as daily bread, for recognition as well as cash, for astonishment rather than torpor; in short, for a sort of life rather than a Monday through Friday sort of dying.” – Studs Terkel

Poets Creating Conversation is a multi-part series that asks poets to help us unpack and navigate through issues that we are all inexorably wrapped in. Expect hard truths and humor; cautionary tales and inspirational stories all rolled into a fast paced program.

Jun
27
Wed
Becket, MA–Moonlight Canoe Trip with Mass Audubon Staff @ Buckley Dunton Lake
Jun 27 @ 8:00 pm – 10:30 pm

Instructor: Sanctuary Naturalist
Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00
Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00

Twilight is an amazing time to listen and look for wildlife. Herons, loons, beavers, owls, and other wildlife are all possible at Buckley Dunton Lake in October Mountain State Forest. We’ll stealthily explore the coves and inlets of this beautiful lake, then hitch our boats together to enjoy snacks and beverages while we listen for nocturnal wildlife sounds.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Lenox, MA–Evening at the Beaver Ponds @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jun 27 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 3 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $6.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $4.00
Enjoy an evening searching for beavers and other wildlife that frequent our wildlife sanctuary ponds. Learn about the lives of beavers, their amazing recovery story, and how they continue to shape the landscape more than 80 years after their reintroduction to the area.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jun
30
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jun 30 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Pittsfield, MA–Library in the Wilderness Workshop with Berkshire Natural Resources Council Staff @ Berkshire Athenaeum, Pittsfield’s Public Library
Jun 30 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Saturday, June 30, 2018, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Learn about local flora and fauna and find out how to check out a backpack fully equipped for an outdoor adventure.

Email Mariah at mauman@bnrc.org or call 413-499-0596 with any questions.

Jul
1
Sun
LENOX, MA–Canoeing the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon staff
Jul 1 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am
Location: New Lenox Road, Lenox
Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
This leisurely paddle will take us through the ecologically rich Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in Lenox. We’ll watch for swallows, herons, kingfishers, muskrats, and signs of beavers along the scenic and meandering Housatonic River and learn about why the waterway is the natural heart of the Berkshires.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
5
Thu
Lenox, MA– Evening Paddle on the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 5 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Evening is the perfect time to look for wildlife. We’ll leisurely explore the rich wetlands of the Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in the hours before dusk, find a cove to come together and enjoy refreshments while we listen and watch for wildlife. Kingfishers, herons, muskrats, beavers, and other wildlife are all possible sightings.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
6
Fri
Lenox, MA–Firefly Watch with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 6 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 0 – 18 years)
Members & Nonmembers: Free
Experience a magical summer light show, and help us track firefly numbers and diversity through the Firefly Watch program. Learn about fireflies and how best to view or gently catch (and release) these mystical glowing lights of summer! We’ll take an evening walk in the meadows for firefly viewing, and also keep our eyes open for stars, planets, and twilight birds and mammals!
Suggested contribution $4/person or $10/family
Directions to the meeting place will be provided upon registration.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
7
Sat
Lenox, MA–Canoeing the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 7 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.
This leisurely paddle will take us through the ecologically rich Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in Lenox. We’ll watch for swallows, herons, kingfishers, muskrats, and signs of beavers along the scenic and meandering Housatonic River and learn about why the waterway is the natural heart of the Berkshires.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 7 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Lenox, MA– Pleasant Valley Wildlife Ramble with Mass Audubon Staff @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 7 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 0 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $5.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $6.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.

Explore the lower trails at Pleasant Valley with an experienced guide. We’ll search for evidence of (and hopefully see!) many wild birds and mammals as we hike along the rich pond and stream ecosystems that form the heart of the sanctuary. Along the way we’ll also learn about plant communities and the dynamic history of Pleasant Valley.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
8
Sun
Lenox, MA–Canoeing the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 8 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.
This leisurely paddle will take us through the ecologically rich Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in Lenox. We’ll watch for swallows, herons, kingfishers, muskrats, and signs of beavers along the scenic and meandering Housatonic River and learn about why the waterway is the natural heart of the Berkshires.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
10
Tue
Stockbridge, MA–HVA Beginner’s Paddle: Glendale Dam
Jul 10 @ 4:30 pm – 7:00 pm

July 10, 2018      from  4:30 – 7 pm         trip length 1 – 2 miles
In partnership with: THE HOUSATONIC HERITAGE AREA  & HOUSATONIC VALLEY ASSOC.

Want to be prepared for other paddle trips – experience canoeing – gain confidence? This is your chance! Join us to learn how to safely enter and exit a canoe, learn the basic strokes and how to steer and paddle safely. Led by Housatonic Valley Assoc. volunteer, Charles Murray, an experienced canoeist and ACA certified instructor. Suitable for families with children ages 10yrs+.

Registration is required, space is limited. Call 413-298-7024
Canoes and equipment provided or register to bring your own boat.
Trip information provided upon completion of registration.

Jul
11
Wed
Lenox, MA–Evening at the Beaver Ponds with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 11 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 3 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $6.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $4.00

Enjoy an evening searching for beavers and other wildlife that frequent our wildlife sanctuary ponds. Learn about the lives of beavers, their amazing recovery story, and how they continue to shape the landscape more than 80 years after their reintroduction to the area.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
12
Thu
Lenox, MA– Evening Paddle on the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 12 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Evening is the perfect time to look for wildlife. We’ll leisurely explore the rich wetlands of the Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in the hours before dusk, find a cove to come together and enjoy refreshments while we listen and watch for wildlife. Kingfishers, herons, muskrats, beavers, and other wildlife are all possible sightings.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
14
Sat
Tyringham, MA–Canoe Upper & Lower Goose Ponds with Mass Audubon @ goose pond
Jul 14 @ 8:30 am – 12:00 pm

Instructor: Sanctuary Naturalist
Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Explore the coves and marshes of one of the Berkshires’ most beautiful lakes. Paddle across Lower Goose Pond to pristine Upper Goose Pond in search of eagles, herons, and kingfishers.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 14 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Lenox, MA– Pleasant Valley Wildlife Ramble with Mass Audubon Staff @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 14 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 0 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $5.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $6.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.

Explore the lower trails at Pleasant Valley with an experienced guide. We’ll search for evidence of (and hopefully see!) many wild birds and mammals as we hike along the rich pond and stream ecosystems that form the heart of the sanctuary. Along the way we’ll also learn about plant communities and the dynamic history of Pleasant Valley.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Lenox, MA–Firefly Watch at Cold Brook with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary,
Jul 14 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 0 – 18 years)
Members & Nonmembers: Free
Experience a magical summer light show, and help us track firefly numbers and diversity through the Firefly Watch program. Learn about fireflies and how best to view or gently catch (and release) these mystical glowing lights of summer! We’ll take an evening walk in the meadows for firefly viewing, and also keep our eyes open for stars, planets, and twilight birds and mammals!
Suggested contribution $4/person or $10/family
Directions to the meeting place will be provided upon registration.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
15
Sun
Lenox, MA–Canoeing the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 15 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.
This leisurely paddle will take us through the ecologically rich Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in Lenox. We’ll watch for swallows, herons, kingfishers, muskrats, and signs of beavers along the scenic and meandering Housatonic River and learn about why the waterway is the natural heart of the Berkshires.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
19
Thu
Lenox, MA– Evening Paddle on the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 19 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Evening is the perfect time to look for wildlife. We’ll leisurely explore the rich wetlands of the Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in the hours before dusk, find a cove to come together and enjoy refreshments while we listen and watch for wildlife. Kingfishers, herons, muskrats, beavers, and other wildlife are all possible sightings.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
20
Fri
Lenox, MA–Evening at the Beaver Ponds with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 20 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 3 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $6.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $4.00

Enjoy an evening searching for beavers and other wildlife that frequent our wildlife sanctuary ponds. Learn about the lives of beavers, their amazing recovery story, and how they continue to shape the landscape more than 80 years after their reintroduction to the area.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
21
Sat
Lenox, MA–Canoeing the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 21 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.
This leisurely paddle will take us through the ecologically rich Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in Lenox. We’ll watch for swallows, herons, kingfishers, muskrats, and signs of beavers along the scenic and meandering Housatonic River and learn about why the waterway is the natural heart of the Berkshires.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 21 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Lenox, MA– Pleasant Valley Wildlife Ramble with Mass Audubon Staff @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 21 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 0 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $5.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $6.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.

Explore the lower trails at Pleasant Valley with an experienced guide. We’ll search for evidence of (and hopefully see!) many wild birds and mammals as we hike along the rich pond and stream ecosystems that form the heart of the sanctuary. Along the way we’ll also learn about plant communities and the dynamic history of Pleasant Valley.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
22
Sun
Lenox, MA–Canoeing the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 22 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.
This leisurely paddle will take us through the ecologically rich Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in Lenox. We’ll watch for swallows, herons, kingfishers, muskrats, and signs of beavers along the scenic and meandering Housatonic River and learn about why the waterway is the natural heart of the Berkshires.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
25
Wed
Lenox, MA–Evening at the Beaver Ponds with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 25 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 3 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $6.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $4.00

Enjoy an evening searching for beavers and other wildlife that frequent our wildlife sanctuary ponds. Learn about the lives of beavers, their amazing recovery story, and how they continue to shape the landscape more than 80 years after their reintroduction to the area.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
26
Thu
Becket, MA–Moonlight Canoe Trip with Mass Audubon Staff @ Buckley Dunton Lake
Jul 26 @ 7:30 pm – 10:30 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00

Twilight is an amazing time to listen and look for wildlife. Herons, loons, beavers, owls, and other wildlife are all possible at Buckley Dunton Lake in October Mountain State Forest. We’ll stealthily explore the coves and inlets of this beautiful lake, then hitch our boats together to enjoy snacks and beverages while we listen for nocturnal wildlife sounds.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
27
Fri
Lenox, MA–Evening at the Beaver Ponds with Mass Audubon @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
Jul 27 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 3 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $6.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $4.00

Enjoy an evening searching for beavers and other wildlife that frequent our wildlife sanctuary ponds. Learn about the lives of beavers, their amazing recovery story, and how they continue to shape the landscape more than 80 years after their reintroduction to the area.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Tyringham, MA–Community-based arts festival celebrating Tyringham’s visual, artisanal, musical, literary, cinematic and performing artists
Jul 27 @ 8:00 pm – Jul 29 @ 11:00 am

UBU Theater and Tyringham residents invite the public to a celebration of the countless artists concealed within this small community of 400 folks.

Friday, July 27th, at 8 pm– outdoor movie night featuring two documentary
films behind the Union Church of Tyringham (128 Main Road, Tyringham).

Tickets: Free
Enjoy a screening of “Yaz The Final Swing,” a film that chronicles Carl Yastrzemski’s final season with the Boston Red Sox. Follow and listen to Yaz speak frankly about his work, family and the price paid for such single-minded passion and excellence in this 1983 documentary by Bill Cosel and Adrienne Miesmer.

9 pm: Stay for a screening of “Re-Evolution: the Cuban Dream,” by Cray Novick.

——-

Saturday, July 28th, from 12 pm to 4:30 pm–the full arts festival will take place (rain or shine) on the grounds and neighboring hill of the Union Church of Tyringham. View exhibits by local artists and artisans including fine art, ceramics, photography, textiles, quilts and upholstery, needlepoint, stencils, beading and a community loom. Children’s activities include tiny fairy-house construction, a UBU Youth Theater performance of “A Fly in My Soup,” and a delightful improvisational performance by Backyard Chickens, comprised of original stories written/dictated by child festival-goers.

Tickets: $5 per person, under 12 free\ 12 noon to 4:30 pm

7 pm, all are invited to attend a square-dance

Tickets: $5 per person, under 12 free\ 12 noon to 4:30 pm:

—–

Sunday, July 29, from 7 am to 11 am–join the town for a pancake breakfast prepared by the Tyringham Volunteer Fire Department and enjoy some live, old-style, radio show entertainment (100 Main Road, Tyringham).

Location: 100 Main Road, Tyringham, MA
Tickets: $8 Adults, $6 Seniors and kids under 12

————

Jul
28
Sat
Becket, MA–Canoeing October Mountain State Forest: Buckley Dunton Lake @ Buckley Dunton Lake
Jul 28 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years) Members: Adult $20.00, Child $20.00
Nonmembers: Adult $30.00, Child $30.00

Herons, loons, beavers, and other wildlife are all possible sightings on this large, secluded lake in October Mountain State Forest. Explore the coves and inlets of this beautiful lake and we’ll go ashore to eat a snack, visit forest plant communities, and search for signs of animals such as
porcupines and moose.

Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 28 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Lenox, Ma–Paddling on the Housatonic River:  In Search of Turtles
Jul 28 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
Lenox, Ma–Paddling on the Housatonic River:  In Search of Turtles

Trip Length: 3 – 4 miles Level: Beginner (6+yrs)

Paddle downstream from Woods Pond and back enjoying the Housatonic River as we search for painted and other turtle species basking along the river’s edge and learn about these ancient reptiles that are struggling to maintain their populations. This paddle trip is suitable for families with children 6 yrs and older.

Registration is required, space is limited. Call 413-298-7024
Canoes and equipment provided or register to bring your own boat.
Trip information provided upon completion of registration.

In partnership with: THE HOUSATONIC HERITAGE AREA

====

Get on the river! The best way to enjoy this gorgeous body of water is through a paddling trip.  Housatonic River paddle trips are suitable for most skill levels (see individual descriptions) and are an ideal way to see the river.

CALL 413-298-7024 TO REGISTER or EMAIL
Registration is required as space is limited. Canoes and equipment provided. Trip information provided upon completion of registration.
=====

Jul
29
Sun
Lenox, MA–Canoeing the Housatonic River with Mass Audubon @ decker boat launch
Jul 29 @ 8:30 am – 11:30 am

Audience: All (suitable for children 10 – 18 years)
Members: Adult $25.00, Child $25.00 Nonmembers: Adult $35.00, Child $35.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.
This leisurely paddle will take us through the ecologically rich Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area in Lenox. We’ll watch for swallows, herons, kingfishers, muskrats, and signs of beavers along the scenic and meandering Housatonic River and learn about why the waterway is the natural heart of the Berkshires.
Register at massaudubon.org/pleasantvalley or by calling (413) 637-0320

Jul
31
Tue
Pittsfield, MA–Word x Word Event: Story Slam / Impeachable Offenses @ Berkshire Athenaeum, Pittsfield’s Public Library
Jul 31 @ 7:00 pm

First person, true stories told without notes or props – similar to NPR’s Moth Story Slam. Scored olympic-style by volunteers from the audience. Register online

Aug
1
Wed
Pittsfield, MA–Word x Word Event: Poetry sCrawl
Aug 1 @ 4:00 pm

Open to all ages, styles and experience level. The coolest thing to happen on North Street. A “moving” open-mic style event open to all ages and themes. Perfect for poets, soon-to-be-poets, and just-sticking-my-toe-in-the-water-poets. Join us for an optional workshop at 4P (for a little inspiration) or meet us at Dottie’s for the sCrawl!

August 1, @ 4 pm
sCrawl Workshop
Hotel On North, 297 North Street, Pittsfield
Poets of all ages & varieties are invited to join us for a generative workshop. And then stick around for the sCrawl and a chance to take your work for a walk. Preregistration required. Register online

Pittsfield, MA–Word x Word Event: Poetry sCrawl
Aug 1 @ 6:00 pm

Starts at Dottie’s, 444 North Street, Pittsfield & ends at the Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, 28 Renne Ave

Poetry takes a walk Uptown – followed by an reception and open mic. Register online
Poetry sCrawl . A “moving” open-mic style event open to all ages and themes. Possibly the coolest thing that happens on North Street. Perfect for poets of all ages, soon-to-be-poets, and just-sticking-my-toe-in-the-water-poets.
—-

Aug
2
Thu
Pittsfield, MA–2nd Annual Moby Dick Reading Marathon @ Arrowhead Museum
Aug 2 all-day

Where it was written… Over the winter of 1850-1851, Herman Melville worked in his study at Arrowhead, creating one of the greatest works in American literature. From August 2 – 5, the Berkshire County Historical Society at Arrowhead is pleased to host the second annual marathon reading of that great work, Moby-Dick. Please join us!

On August 2, 3, and 4, the reading will begin each day at 10 am and conclude at 5 pm. On the final day, Sunday, August 5, the reading will resume at 1 pm (after the annual hike up Monument Mountain) and then continue until the exciting conclusion (approximately 5:15).

TO BE A MARATHON MOBY DICK READER:

If you are interested in reading, please fill in the form at www.berkshirehistory.org, in the post labeled “Sign up to read Moby-Dick at the 2nd annual marathon.”

We will reserve one slot – depending on availability – per reader. It is possible that once you arrive, additional slots may be available.
Please indicate your preferred day and hour. If there is space available, you will be assigned to read sometime within that hour, and we’ll let you know by e-mail. Each reader is scheduled for 10 minutes.

If you sign up before June 11, your name will be included in the official program. Please indicate how you’d you like your name spelled.
NOTE: A few hours are already reserved; these hours will not be visible on the form.
You’ll receive a confirmation of your assigned time via return e-mail.
TEAMS – if you can put together a team of six readers, contact us at mobydickmarathon@berkshirehistory.org

-Each reader will get a special sticker. This indicates you have read Moby-Dick at Arrowhead, and entitles you to 10% off merchandise in the shop. Discount is valid during the days of the marathon.
-We cannot “save” passages for any individual–the scheduling would be too complex. When it’s your 10 minutes, you’re at the podium. It’s all good!
-We’ll supply a copy of Moby-Dick that all readers will read from. If you want to bring along your own copy to follow when you are not reading, that’s fine.
-There is no charge for reading. (But donations to support Arrowhead are gratefully accepted.)

Aug
3
Fri
Pittsfield, MA–2nd Annual Moby Dick Reading Marathon @ Arrowhead Museum
Aug 3 all-day

Where it was written… Over the winter of 1850-1851, Herman Melville worked in his study at Arrowhead, creating one of the greatest works in American literature. From August 2 – 5, the Berkshire County Historical Society at Arrowhead is pleased to host the second annual marathon reading of that great work, Moby-Dick. Please join us!

On August 2, 3, and 4, the reading will begin each day at 10 am and conclude at 5 pm. On the final day, Sunday, August 5, the reading will resume at 1 pm (after the annual hike up Monument Mountain) and then continue until the exciting conclusion (approximately 5:15).

TO BE A MARATHON MOBY DICK READER:

If you are interested in reading, please fill in the form at www.berkshirehistory.org, in the post labeled “Sign up to read Moby-Dick at the 2nd annual marathon.”

We will reserve one slot – depending on availability – per reader. It is possible that once you arrive, additional slots may be available.
Please indicate your preferred day and hour. If there is space available, you will be assigned to read sometime within that hour, and we’ll let you know by e-mail. Each reader is scheduled for 10 minutes.

If you sign up before June 11, your name will be included in the official program. Please indicate how you’d you like your name spelled.
NOTE: A few hours are already reserved; these hours will not be visible on the form.
You’ll receive a confirmation of your assigned time via return e-mail.
TEAMS – if you can put together a team of six readers, contact us at mobydickmarathon@berkshirehistory.org

-Each reader will get a special sticker. This indicates you have read Moby-Dick at Arrowhead, and entitles you to 10% off merchandise in the shop. Discount is valid during the days of the marathon.
-We cannot “save” passages for any individual–the scheduling would be too complex. When it’s your 10 minutes, you’re at the podium. It’s all good!
-We’ll supply a copy of Moby-Dick that all readers will read from. If you want to bring along your own copy to follow when you are not reading, that’s fine.
-There is no charge for reading. (But donations to support Arrowhead are gratefully accepted.)

Pittsfield, MA–Word x Word Event: Head-To-Head Haiku @ Dottie's Cafe
Aug 3 @ 7:00 pm

Head-To-Head Haiku is a good humored twist on the Poetry Slam format. Poets compete one-on-one armed with only 17 syllables. Register online

———-

Aug
4
Sat
Pittsfield, MA–2nd Annual Moby Dick Reading Marathon @ Arrowhead Museum
Aug 4 all-day

Where it was written… Over the winter of 1850-1851, Herman Melville worked in his study at Arrowhead, creating one of the greatest works in American literature. From August 2 – 5, the Berkshire County Historical Society at Arrowhead is pleased to host the second annual marathon reading of that great work, Moby-Dick. Please join us!

On August 2, 3, and 4, the reading will begin each day at 10 am and conclude at 5 pm. On the final day, Sunday, August 5, the reading will resume at 1 pm (after the annual hike up Monument Mountain) and then continue until the exciting conclusion (approximately 5:15).

TO BE A MARATHON MOBY DICK READER:

If you are interested in reading, please fill in the form at www.berkshirehistory.org, in the post labeled “Sign up to read Moby-Dick at the 2nd annual marathon.”

We will reserve one slot – depending on availability – per reader. It is possible that once you arrive, additional slots may be available.
Please indicate your preferred day and hour. If there is space available, you will be assigned to read sometime within that hour, and we’ll let you know by e-mail. Each reader is scheduled for 10 minutes.

If you sign up before June 11, your name will be included in the official program. Please indicate how you’d you like your name spelled.
NOTE: A few hours are already reserved; these hours will not be visible on the form.
You’ll receive a confirmation of your assigned time via return e-mail.
TEAMS – if you can put together a team of six readers, contact us at mobydickmarathon@berkshirehistory.org

-Each reader will get a special sticker. This indicates you have read Moby-Dick at Arrowhead, and entitles you to 10% off merchandise in the shop. Discount is valid during the days of the marathon.
-We cannot “save” passages for any individual–the scheduling would be too complex. When it’s your 10 minutes, you’re at the podium. It’s all good!
-We’ll supply a copy of Moby-Dick that all readers will read from. If you want to bring along your own copy to follow when you are not reading, that’s fine.
-There is no charge for reading. (But donations to support Arrowhead are gratefully accepted.)

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 4 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Pittsfield, MA–Word x Word Event: Outspoken Youth Poetry Workshop @ Lichtenstein Center for the Arts
Aug 4 @ 11:00 am

For ages 12-20. Workshop with guest poet Olivia McKee. Outspoken is a safe and supportive space for poets of all experience and confidence levels. Register online
——

Pittsfield, MA–Word x Word Event: Outspoken Youth Poetry Slam & Open Mic @ Lichtenstein Center for the Arts
Aug 4 @ 1:30 pm

Workshop participants ages 12-20 perform. An opportunity to share our work in a supportive environment. Poets may opt to share at the open mic or compete in a friendly poetry slam. Open to the public.

WordXWord uses spoken word, poetry and storytelling in shared space and time to celebrate diversity and creativity, empower the individual, foster understanding and empathy, and make real human connections. All WXW programs are free and open to all.

Aug
5
Sun
Pittsfield, MA–2nd Annual Moby Dick Reading Marathon @ Arrowhead Museum
Aug 5 all-day

Where it was written… Over the winter of 1850-1851, Herman Melville worked in his study at Arrowhead, creating one of the greatest works in American literature. From August 2 – 5, the Berkshire County Historical Society at Arrowhead is pleased to host the second annual marathon reading of that great work, Moby-Dick. Please join us!

On August 2, 3, and 4, the reading will begin each day at 10 am and conclude at 5 pm. On the final day, Sunday, August 5, the reading will resume at 1 pm (after the annual hike up Monument Mountain) and then continue until the exciting conclusion (approximately 5:15).

TO BE A MARATHON MOBY DICK READER:

If you are interested in reading, please fill in the form at www.berkshirehistory.org, in the post labeled “Sign up to read Moby-Dick at the 2nd annual marathon.”

We will reserve one slot – depending on availability – per reader. It is possible that once you arrive, additional slots may be available.
Please indicate your preferred day and hour. If there is space available, you will be assigned to read sometime within that hour, and we’ll let you know by e-mail. Each reader is scheduled for 10 minutes.

If you sign up before June 11, your name will be included in the official program. Please indicate how you’d you like your name spelled.
NOTE: A few hours are already reserved; these hours will not be visible on the form.
You’ll receive a confirmation of your assigned time via return e-mail.
TEAMS – if you can put together a team of six readers, contact us at mobydickmarathon@berkshirehistory.org

-Each reader will get a special sticker. This indicates you have read Moby-Dick at Arrowhead, and entitles you to 10% off merchandise in the shop. Discount is valid during the days of the marathon.
-We cannot “save” passages for any individual–the scheduling would be too complex. When it’s your 10 minutes, you’re at the podium. It’s all good!
-We’ll supply a copy of Moby-Dick that all readers will read from. If you want to bring along your own copy to follow when you are not reading, that’s fine.
-There is no charge for reading. (But donations to support Arrowhead are gratefully accepted.)

Norfolk, CT–Open House at the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival @ Norfolk Chamber Music Festival - Yale School of Music
Aug 5 @ 2:00 pm

A day of free events culminating is a performance by the Frank Vignola Trio

Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate–Music Shed
860 542 3000

 

Aug
11
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 11 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
18
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 18 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Aug
25
Sat
Gt. Barrington, MA– Family Paddling Trip on the Housatonic River
Aug 25 @ 9:00 am – 3:00 pm
Gt. Barrington, MA-- Family Paddling Trip on the Housatonic River

Get on the river! The best way to enjoy this gorgeous body of water is through a paddling trip. Housatonic River paddle trips are suitable for most skill levels (see individual descriptions) and are an ideal way to see the river.

CALL 413-298-7024 TO REGISTER or EMAIL– PADDLE@HVATODAY.ORG
Registration is required as space is limited. Canoes and equipment provided. Trip information provided upon completion of registration.
=====

Trip Length: 6.6 miles Level: Beginner (10+yrs)

Get your family out for a day of river exploration! We’ll paddle from Bridge Street, Great Barrington to the Covered Bridge in Sheffield stopping for lunch on a sandbar where the Green River joins the Housatonic. This meandering stretch of the Housatonic River is mostly calm with occasional quickwater and downed trees to negotiate. Suitable for families with children 10+yrs.

Registration is required, space is limited. Call 413-298-7024
Canoes and equipment provided or register to bring your own boat.
Trip information provided upon completion of registration.

In partnership with: THE HOUSATONIC HERITAGE AREA

 

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 25 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Sep
1
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Sep 1 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Sep
8
Sat
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 8 all-day
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Sep 8 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Sep
9
Sun
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 9 all-day
Lanesborough/Adams, MA–Free Public Program: Printmaking demo and workshop with Kelly Slater (Art/Family Fun) @ Bascom Lodge-Atop Mount Greylock
Sep 9 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Hands on printmaking for adults and children of all ages.

THIS IS A “FREE” PUBLIC PROGRAMMING EVENT OFFERED IN COLLABORATION WITH THE UPPER HOUSATONIC VALLEY NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA.

AT AN ELEVATION OF 3,491 FEET, BASCOM LODGE AT THE SUMMIT OF MOUNT GREYLOCK DOMINATES THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE; AFFORDING PARK VISTAS OF FOUR STATES AND FIVE MOUNTAIN RANGES. LOCATED IN THE HEART OF BERKSHIRE COUNTY, THE LODGE IS A RUSTIC ARTS AND CRAFTS MOUNTAIN LODGE BUILT IN THE 1930’S BY VOLUNTEERS FROM THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS. CONSTRUCTED OF LOCAL STONE AND OLD GROWTH RED SPRUCE TIMBERS, THE LODGE WAS DESIGNED IN AN ARCHITECTURAL STYLE THAT WOULD LATER BECOME THE BLUEPRINT FOR AMERICA’S NATIONAL PARKS. NESTLED ON THE SUMMIT OF MT. GREYLOCK, THE STATE’S HIGHEST MOUNTAIN, THE LODGE IS THE CENTERPIECE OF A 12,500 ACRE WILDERNESS PARK.

FROM RT 7, DRIVE TO LANESBOROUGH AND WATCH FOR THE MOUNT GREYLOCK RESERVATION AND VISITOR CENTER SIGNS (2 MILES NORTH OF LANESBORO TOWN LINE). TURN ONTO NORTH MAIN STREET, THEN BEAR RIGHT ONTO QUARRY ROAD, THEN BEAR LEFT ONTO ROCKWELL ROAD AND FOLLOW MOUNT GREYLOCK/BASCOM LODGE SIGNS FOR 9 MILES THROUGH THE FOREST TO THE SUMMIT.

413-743-1591, www.bascomlodge.net

Sep
15
Sat
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 15 all-day
Sheffield, MA–Paddle the Housatonic River from Bartholomew’s Sheffield – Falls Village, CT
Sep 15 @ 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Sheffield, MA--Paddle the Housatonic River from Bartholomew’s Sheffield – Falls Village, CT

Get on the river! The best way to enjoy this gorgeous body of water is through a paddling trip. Housatonic River paddle trips are suitable for most skill levels (see individual descriptions) and are an ideal way to see the river.

CALL 413-298-7024 TO REGISTER or EMAIL– PADDLE@HVATODAY.ORG
All events are FREE! Registration is required as space is limited. Canoes and equipment provided. Trip information provided upon completion of registration.

Trip Length:8.6 miles Level: Intermediate (14+yrs)

Paddle through farms and forest with an eye to the sky for migrating raptors as you wind your way down the Housatonic River to Falls Village, CT. There is a short, 200ft or so, portage around an old dam almost midway in the trip. It is flat, meandering river all the way so easy paddling, but a long day for some as there isn’t much current. Suitable for families with children 14yrs+.

Registration is required, space is limited. Call 413-298-7024
Canoes and equipment provided or register to bring your own boat.
Trip information provided upon completion of registration.

East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Sep 15 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Sep
16
Sun
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 16 all-day
Sep
22
Sat
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 22 all-day
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Sep 22 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Sep
23
Sun
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 23 all-day
Sep
28
Fri
Kent, CT–Conn. Antique Museum Assoc’s 34th Anniversary of our famous Kent Fall Festival @ CAMA (CT Antique Museum Assoc) museum grounds
Sep 28 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

 

This event is held rain or shine. We have plenty of indoor shelter.

Our restored drag saw will be demonstrated, as well as our American #1 sawmill. Both have plenty of logs to be cut. There will be demonstrations throughout the weekend of the sawmill, as well as our other wood handling machinery including an antique planer and a splitter.  All this in our consolidated wood handling area at the north end of the exhibit field.

Skip Kern, our lead man in the Blacksmith Shop, plans a full weekend of demonstrations along with a number of other area blacksmiths setting up shop in and near ours.

There has been much cosmetic improvement in our Industrial Hall of Steam. Come see the improved appearance and stay for the live demonstrations of our various antique steam engines.  We will be running the Nagle-Corliss engine that saw its operational debut at our 2015 show.

Take a ride on Hawaii Railway #5, a restored 1925 Baldwin narrow gauge locomotive.  As always, the ride is free and as always the running of #5 is subject to weather  and the will of the machinery gods.

See the now completed addition to the CT Museum of Mining and Mineral Science.  John Pawloski and a dedicated team have been hard at work preparing special new exhibits for this substantial addition.

Besides all of CAMA’s permanent exhibits, the grounds will be filled with vendors and outside exhibitors that have brought items to be sold, or shown off.

Sep
29
Sat
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 29 all-day
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Sep 29 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Kent, CT–Conn. Antique Museum Assoc’s 34th Anniversary of our famous Kent Fall Festival @ CAMA (CT Antique Museum Assoc) museum grounds
Sep 29 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

 

This event is held rain or shine. We have plenty of indoor shelter.

Our restored drag saw will be demonstrated, as well as our American #1 sawmill. Both have plenty of logs to be cut. There will be demonstrations throughout the weekend of the sawmill, as well as our other wood handling machinery including an antique planer and a splitter.  All this in our consolidated wood handling area at the north end of the exhibit field.

Skip Kern, our lead man in the Blacksmith Shop, plans a full weekend of demonstrations along with a number of other area blacksmiths setting up shop in and near ours.

There has been much cosmetic improvement in our Industrial Hall of Steam. Come see the improved appearance and stay for the live demonstrations of our various antique steam engines.  We will be running the Nagle-Corliss engine that saw its operational debut at our 2015 show.

Take a ride on Hawaii Railway #5, a restored 1925 Baldwin narrow gauge locomotive.  As always, the ride is free and as always the running of #5 is subject to weather  and the will of the machinery gods.

See the now completed addition to the CT Museum of Mining and Mineral Science.  John Pawloski and a dedicated team have been hard at work preparing special new exhibits for this substantial addition.

Besides all of CAMA’s permanent exhibits, the grounds will be filled with vendors and outside exhibitors that have brought items to be sold, or shown off.

Sep
30
Sun
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 30 all-day
Kent, CT–Conn. Antique Museum Assoc’s 34th Anniversary of our famous Kent Fall Festival @ CAMA (CT Antique Museum Assoc) museum grounds
Sep 30 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

 

This event is held rain or shine. We have plenty of indoor shelter.

Our restored drag saw will be demonstrated, as well as our American #1 sawmill. Both have plenty of logs to be cut. There will be demonstrations throughout the weekend of the sawmill, as well as our other wood handling machinery including an antique planer and a splitter.  All this in our consolidated wood handling area at the north end of the exhibit field.

Skip Kern, our lead man in the Blacksmith Shop, plans a full weekend of demonstrations along with a number of other area blacksmiths setting up shop in and near ours.

There has been much cosmetic improvement in our Industrial Hall of Steam. Come see the improved appearance and stay for the live demonstrations of our various antique steam engines.  We will be running the Nagle-Corliss engine that saw its operational debut at our 2015 show.

Take a ride on Hawaii Railway #5, a restored 1925 Baldwin narrow gauge locomotive.  As always, the ride is free and as always the running of #5 is subject to weather  and the will of the machinery gods.

See the now completed addition to the CT Museum of Mining and Mineral Science.  John Pawloski and a dedicated team have been hard at work preparing special new exhibits for this substantial addition.

Besides all of CAMA’s permanent exhibits, the grounds will be filled with vendors and outside exhibitors that have brought items to be sold, or shown off.

Oct
6
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Guided Tours of Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument @ Beckley Furnace
Oct 6 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

Oct
13
Sat
Lenox, MA–Paddling on the Housatonic River–Fall Foliage Paddle the Darey Wildlife Management Area
Oct 13 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
Lenox, MA--Paddling on the Housatonic River--Fall Foliage Paddle the Darey Wildlife Management Area

Get on the river! The best way to enjoy this gorgeous body of water is through a paddling trip. Housatonic River paddle trips are suitable for most skill levels (see individual descriptions) and are an ideal way to see the river.

CALL 413-298-7024 TO REGISTER or EMAIL– PADDLE@HVATODAY.ORG
All events are FREE! Registration is required as space is limited. Canoes and equipment provided. Trip information provided upon completion of registration.
=====

Trip Length: about 3- 4 miles Level: Beginner (6+yrs)

We will paddle a favorite section of the Housatonic River in Lenox during fall foliage time. Enjoy beautiful views of October Mountain State Forest as you meander along the Housatonic. This is an easy, flat water paddling with minimal current. Suitable for families with children 6+ yrs).

Registration is required, space is limited. Call 413-298-7024
Canoes and equipment provided or register to bring your own boat.
Trip information provided upon completion of registration.
In partnership with: THE HOUSATONIC HERITAGE AREA