Events

Aug
22
Wed
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Aug 22 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Aug
25
Sat
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Aug 25 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Gt. Barrington, MA– Family Paddling Trip on the Housatonic River
Aug 25 @ 9:00 am – 3:00 pm
Gt. Barrington, MA-- Family Paddling Trip on the Housatonic River

Get on the river! The best way to enjoy this gorgeous body of water is through a paddling trip. Housatonic River paddle trips are suitable for most skill levels (see individual descriptions) and are an ideal way to see the river.

CALL 413-298-7024 TO REGISTER or EMAIL– PADDLE@HVATODAY.ORG
Registration is required as space is limited. Canoes and equipment provided. Trip information provided upon completion of registration.
=====

Trip Length: 6.6 miles Level: Beginner (10+yrs)

Get your family out for a day of river exploration! We’ll paddle from Bridge Street, Great Barrington to the Covered Bridge in Sheffield stopping for lunch on a sandbar where the Green River joins the Housatonic. This meandering stretch of the Housatonic River is mostly calm with occasional quickwater and downed trees to negotiate. Suitable for families with children 10+yrs.

Registration is required, space is limited. Call 413-298-7024
Canoes and equipment provided or register to bring your own boat.
Trip information provided upon completion of registration.

In partnership with: THE HOUSATONIC HERITAGE AREA

 

Sheffield, MA–Canoe Rentals on the Housatonic River at Bartholomew’s Cobble @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Aug 25 @ 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Ever wanted to explore the Housatonic in a Canoe? Come to the Cobble and rent a boat, or two, for you and your friends and family.

We have the paddles and the lifejackets, so just bring your sense of joy and adventure for this wonderful way to spend an afternoon. Boats are available for 2 hours, on a first come first serve basis.

For questions during normal business hours, please call 413-298-3239 x3013, during the weekend please call 413-229-8600.

Telephone: 413.229.8600 E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

413.298.3239 x3013
cpetrikhuff@thetrustees.org

Aug
26
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Canoe Adventures on the Housatonic River @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Aug 26 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am

Want to learn more about the Housatonic River and the creatures that call this spectacular river home? Then come on a guided canoe trip on Sunday mornings June-August. Children that are under 100 pounds are welcome to sit in the middle of the boat. This trip is best for paddlers with some experience and stamina. A short half mile walk on the road and then through a field are required to get to where the boats are located. Paddlers should be comfortable walking on uneven ground, sitting for an hour at a time and paddling upstream against a mild current. Pre-registration is required. Private tours are available at different times for groups of 8 or mor

Cost–
Member Adult: $15; Member Child: $9;
Nonmember Adult: $25; Nonmember Child: $15;

Contact Information
413.298.3239 x3013
cpetrikhuff@thetrustees.org

Sheffield, MA–Canoe Rentals on the Housatonic River at Bartholomew’s Cobble @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Aug 26 @ 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Ever wanted to explore the Housatonic in a Canoe? Come to the Cobble and rent a boat, or two, for you and your friends and family.

We have the paddles and the lifejackets, so just bring your sense of joy and adventure for this wonderful way to spend an afternoon. Boats are available for 2 hours, on a first come first serve basis.

For questions during normal business hours, please call 413-298-3239 x3013, during the weekend please call 413-229-8600.

Telephone: 413.229.8600 E-mail: westregion@thetrustees.org

413.298.3239 x3013
cpetrikhuff@thetrustees.org

Aug
29
Wed
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Aug 29 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Sep
1
Sat
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Sep 1 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Sep
2
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Canoe Adventures on the Housatonic River @ Bartholomew's Cobble
Sep 2 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am

Want to learn more about the Housatonic River and the creatures that call this spectacular river home? Then come on a guided canoe trip on Sunday mornings June-August. Children that are under 100 pounds are welcome to sit in the middle of the boat. This trip is best for paddlers with some experience and stamina. A short half mile walk on the road and then through a field are required to get to where the boats are located. Paddlers should be comfortable walking on uneven ground, sitting for an hour at a time and paddling upstream against a mild current. Pre-registration is required. Private tours are available at different times for groups of 8 or mor

Cost–
Member Adult: $15; Member Child: $9;
Nonmember Adult: $25; Nonmember Child: $15;

Contact Information
413.298.3239 x3013
cpetrikhuff@thetrustees.org

Sep
5
Wed
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Sep 5 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Sep
8
Sat
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 8 all-day
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Sep 8 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Sep
9
Sun
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 9 all-day
Sep
12
Wed
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Sep 12 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Sep
15
Sat
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 15 all-day
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Sep 15 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Sheffield, MA–Paddle the Housatonic River from Bartholomew’s Sheffield – Falls Village, CT
Sep 15 @ 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Sheffield, MA--Paddle the Housatonic River from Bartholomew’s Sheffield – Falls Village, CT

Get on the river! The best way to enjoy this gorgeous body of water is through a paddling trip. Housatonic River paddle trips are suitable for most skill levels (see individual descriptions) and are an ideal way to see the river.

CALL 413-298-7024 TO REGISTER or EMAIL– PADDLE@HVATODAY.ORG
All events are FREE! Registration is required as space is limited. Canoes and equipment provided. Trip information provided upon completion of registration.

Trip Length:8.6 miles Level: Intermediate (14+yrs)

Paddle through farms and forest with an eye to the sky for migrating raptors as you wind your way down the Housatonic River to Falls Village, CT. There is a short, 200ft or so, portage around an old dam almost midway in the trip. It is flat, meandering river all the way so easy paddling, but a long day for some as there isn’t much current. Suitable for families with children 14yrs+.

Registration is required, space is limited. Call 413-298-7024
Canoes and equipment provided or register to bring your own boat.
Trip information provided upon completion of registration.

Sep
16
Sun
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 16 all-day
Sep
19
Wed
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Sep 19 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Sep
22
Sat
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 22 all-day
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Sep 22 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Sep
23
Sun
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 23 all-day
Sep
26
Wed
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Sep 26 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Sep
29
Sat
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 29 all-day
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Sep 29 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Sep
30
Sun
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 30 all-day
Oct
3
Wed
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Oct 3 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Oct
6
Sat
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Oct 6 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Oct
10
Wed
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Oct 10 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Oct
13
Sat
Tyringham, MA–Self Tour at The Trustees of Reservations’ Ashintully Gardens @ Ashintully Gardens
Oct 13 @ 1:00 am – 5:00 am

Open on Wednesdays and Saturdays only from 1 – 5 PM, starting the 1st Wednesday in June through 2nd Saturday in October.

Against the backdrop of a sheltering Berkshires valley, during summer and fall wander through an intimate environment of outdoor sculpture and elegant gardens nourished by a gurgling stream.

What makes Ashintully Gardens a special place?
The 30-year creation of contemporary composer John McLennan, Ashintully Gardens are a serene retreat in the Berkshires surrounded by forested hills and traversed by a rushing stream. Mr. McLennan’s emphasis on elegant form and proportion in music is expressed through his garden design, which helped Ashintully earn the Hunnewell Medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

The gardens blend several natural features – a stream, native deciduous trees, a rounded knoll, and rising flanking meadows – into an ordered arrangement with both formal and informal beauty. Among the formal you’ll find are the Fountain Pond, Pine Park, Rams Head Terrace, Bowling Green, Regency Bridge, and Trellis Triptych. Urns, columns, and statuary ornament the garden, while foot bridges, foot paths, stone stairs, and grassy terraces connect various parts of the garden.

A short trail up the hill leads to the ruins of the a Georgian-style mansion. In 1903, Robb and Grace de Peyster Tytus discovered the Tyringham Valley on their honeymoon. Soon after purchasing the 1,000 acres that they named Ashintully (Gaelic meaning “on the brow of the hill”), they built a Georgian-style mansion on the hill. The prominent home came to be known as the Marble Palace among local residents because of the way the pure white sand that was used for the stucco reflected the sunlight. In 1952, it burned down after being inhabited by two generations of the Tytus-McLennan family, but its Doric columns remain as testament to a bygone era. The present-day ruins command a striking view of distant Berkshire Hills.

Trails–A half-mile woodland trail leads to the ruins of the Marble Palace. Moderate walking. From these ruins, visitors can take in a distant view north through the Tyringham Valley.

Lenox, MA–Paddling on the Housatonic River–Fall Foliage Paddle the Darey Wildlife Management Area
Oct 13 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
Lenox, MA--Paddling on the Housatonic River--Fall Foliage Paddle the Darey Wildlife Management Area

Get on the river! The best way to enjoy this gorgeous body of water is through a paddling trip. Housatonic River paddle trips are suitable for most skill levels (see individual descriptions) and are an ideal way to see the river.

CALL 413-298-7024 TO REGISTER or EMAIL– PADDLE@HVATODAY.ORG
All events are FREE! Registration is required as space is limited. Canoes and equipment provided. Trip information provided upon completion of registration.
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Trip Length: about 3- 4 miles Level: Beginner (6+yrs)

We will paddle a favorite section of the Housatonic River in Lenox during fall foliage time. Enjoy beautiful views of October Mountain State Forest as you meander along the Housatonic. This is an easy, flat water paddling with minimal current. Suitable for families with children 6+ yrs).

Registration is required, space is limited. Call 413-298-7024
Canoes and equipment provided or register to bring your own boat.
Trip information provided upon completion of registration.
In partnership with: THE HOUSATONIC HERITAGE AREA

Nov
10
Sat
Bennington, VT–Annual Western New England Greenway Symposium (US Bicycle Rt 7) @ Bennington Museum
Nov 10 @ 10:00 am – 3:30 pm

THE WESTERN NEW ENGLAND GREENWAY

US Bicycle Route 7

IS U.S. BICYCLE ROUTE 7,

A MULTI-SEGMENT, MULTI-STATE BIKE ROUTE THROUGH CONNECTICUT, MASSACHUSETTS & VT

THAT LINKS NYC AND MONTREAL

(Registration from – 9:30 am to 10 am).

Join us as we continue to develop the Western New England Greenway (WNEG), a contiguous network of bike routes that connect New York City with Montreal. The WNEG connects with the East Coast Greenway in Norwalk, CT and connects with Quebec’s famed Route Verte at the Canada border.