Events

Jun
2
Sat
Gt. Barrington, MA–MUMBET SCREENPLAY READING @ Mahaiwe Performing Arts
Jun 2 @ 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Please join us for a staged reading of the upcoming film “MUMBET.” She could neither read nor write, yet with fearless courage, Elizabeth “Mumbet” Freeman used the very words written by the men she served, “all men are created free and equal” to challenge the courts and sue for her freedom, changing the course of history, 80 years before the Emancipation Proclamation.

This is the true story of an unsung American hero who was truly a founding Mother of our country. MUMBET ~ One act of bravery can change the world

 

Jul
1
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 1 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Jul
8
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Jul
15
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Jul
22
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Jul
29
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Jul 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Aug
5
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Aug 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Aug
12
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Aug 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Aug
19
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Aug 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Aug
26
Sun
Sheffield, MA–Guided Tours (12 pm, 1 pm & 2 pm) of the Ashley House & Learn about two very different people who fought for freedom and liberty – and changed our history. @ ashley house
Aug 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The Ashley House tells the intertwined stories of the Ashleys and the enslaved African Americans who lived here in the 18th century.

Col. John Ashley built the house in 1735, and spent the next decades accumulating wealth and land. By the time of his death in 1802, Ashley owned more than 3,000 acres – including the land that is now The Trustees’ Bartholomew’s Cobble. Ashley supported the American Revolution, heading a committee that wrote the fiery Sheffield Resolves, a petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights, in 1773. His financial success was based in part on the labor of five enslaved African Americans.

Inspired by Revolutionary-era rhetoric and her own desire for freedom, Mum Bett, who was enslaved in the Ashley House, helped end slavery in Massachusetts. In 1781, she sued Col. Ashley for her freedom – and won. Mum Bett was and remains an inspiration to all who learn her story.

Today, the Ashley House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an anchor site on the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail. It contains fine collections of redware, furniture, and tools. The Ashley House is adjacent to Bartholomew’s Cobble Reservation, which offers five miles of scenic trails.

The Ashley House is part of the Berkshire 18th Century Trail.

Trails
At Bartholomew’s Cobble, five miles of moderate hiking; some may find the climb to 1,000-ft. Hurlburt’s Hill strenuous.

Call 413.298.3239 x3016 for more information

Telephone: 413.298.3239 x3008
E-mail: naumkeag@thetrustees.org

Sep
8
Sat
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 8 all-day
Sep
9
Sun
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 9 all-day
Sep
15
Sat
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 15 all-day
Sep
16
Sun
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 16 all-day
Sep
22
Sat
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 22 all-day
Sep
23
Sun
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 23 all-day
Sep
29
Sat
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 29 all-day
Sep
30
Sun
2018 HOUSATONIC HERITAGE WALKS – 60 FREE EVENTS IN THE BERKSHIRES, MA & LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CT
Sep 30 all-day