Events

May
27
Sat
Lanesborough, MA–Memorial Day Weekend Festivities for the 80th Season of Bascom Lodge! @ Bascom Lodge-Atop Mount Greylock
May 27 all-day

Free and Open to the Public! Incantation Workshop – Music & Puppet Performance – Beekeeping Demo–Family fun filled day with local artisans!

Beekeeping Demo 12-1 pm

Richard Clapper from the Northern Berkshire Beekeeper’s Association will discuss the joys and challenges of beekeeping and the workings of the hive. Equipment and resources to get started beekeeping will be reviewed.
Nutshell Playhouse 1-2 pm

The Nutshell Playhouse returns to entertain us with their music and cast of puppet characters

Incantations and Song Magic 2:30 – 4:30

Mt. Greylock is the highest mountain in Massachusetts and J.K Rowling has designated it as the home of Ilvermorny School of Witchcraft and Wizardy!!

In this two hour family and children workshop we will determine if we are Thunderbirds, Horned Serpents, Pukwudgies or Wampuses and then create incantations, chants or poems based on our character. What is the sound at the heart of the snake horn fragment? Our creations can be performed or kept secret.

Rhythm instruments provided or found outdoors.

Let’s see what we got in the way of Defense and Magic.

To register by Saturday, May 27th e-mail: spiesarts@gmail

Free with dragon heartstring.

soundingtheriver.blogspot.com

May
28
Sun
Monterey, MA–Concert and Opening Reception. Amazing Stories from Centuries Past @ The Bidwell House Museum
May 28 @ 3:00 pm

Diane Taraz sings her own songs and others from the folk tradition that tell the true stories of people and events from early America. Enjoy songs about love affairs gone wrong; women warriors in disguise; loves lost to war, shipwreck, and rattlesnakes; and a variety of ballads and ditties that capture amazing history that deserves to be re-lived. Diane wears the clothing of the time and accompanies her singing on an instrument similar to the now-extinct English guitar played by Colonial ladies. Reception and refreshments to follow, celebrating the completed restoration of the museum.

Event free for members. Non-members: $15.

413-528-6888
email: bidwellhouse@gmail.com
www.bidwellhousemuseum.org

A Colonial History Museum
National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1750s

 

May
31
Wed
Gt. Barrington, MA–Guided Birding on the River Walk @ Housatonic River Walk
May 31 @ 7:00 am – 8:00 am

Also at  6-7 pm
with Christine Ward and Sharon Siter
Grab your binoculars and join us as we capture spring bird activity along the Housatonic River.
From common mergansers to nesting nuthatches, River Walk offers great habitat for waterfowl and woodland birds. Birders of all abilities are welcome.

Meet at the Upper River Walk entrance located in the St. Peter’s Church parking lot on Dresser Avenue.

More than 75 species of birds have been sited on River Walk in the past, including bald eagle, great blue heron, kingfisher, and flocks of cedar waxwing. Learn about techniques and tools to help you enjoy the many birds of Berkshire county. Sponsored by Great Barrington Land Conservancy.

Gt. Barrington, MA–Guided Birding on the River Walk @ Housatonic River Walk
May 31 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

with Christine Ward and Sharon Siter
Grab your binoculars and join us as we capture spring bird activity along the Housatonic River.
From common mergansers to nesting nuthatches, River Walk offers great habitat for waterfowl and woodland birds. Birders of all abilities are welcome.

Meet at the Upper River Walk entrance located in the St. Peter’s Church parking lot on Dresser Avenue.

More than 75 species of birds have been sited on River Walk in the past, including bald eagle, great blue heron, kingfisher, and flocks of cedar waxwing. Learn about techniques and tools to help you enjoy the many birds of Berkshire county. Sponsored by Great Barrington Land Conservancy.

Lenox, MA–Evening at the Beaver Ponds @ Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
May 31 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Audience: All (suitable for children 3 – 18 years)

Members: Adult $6.00, Child $3.00 Nonmembers: Adult $8.00, Child $4.00

Enjoy an evening searching for beavers and other wildlife attracted to the series of ponds that the beavers have created. Learn about the natural history of beavers and how they continue to shape the landscape more than 80 years after their reintroduction.

 

Jun
3
Sat
Great Barrington, MA–Celebrate National Trails Day At River Walk: Hikes, Paddle, History Walk, Children’s activity and Community Potluck Picnic
Jun 3 @ 9:00 am – 1:30 pm

 

Meet at the Dubois River Garden Park (corner of Church and River Streets in Great Barrington) to explore the natural landscape through a variety of activities including hiking, paddling, history walk and a riverside activity for children.

9 am-1:30 pm–River Walk Self-guided Tour   / all welcome/ no registration necessary

Come experience the wonder of our own National Recreation Trail. Learn about how trail design and ongoing habitat reclamation are helping to filter  the storm water as it flows to the Housatonic River. Kids can actively experience the Water Cycle with a great game that helps them know where water comes  from and where it goes!

——–

9 a.m.–Exploring GB National Trails Paddle & Hike– Pre-registration Required / space limited

Discover two National Trails with this ambitious excursion. Canoes will be provided for a lovely Housatonic River paddle that will bring us to Kellogg Rd and the Appalachian Trail. We’ll put down our paddles and hoist on our packs for a gently upward 1.7 mile A.T hike up June Mountain to Home Road. Transport will be provided back to River Walk and the potluck picnic. You must pre-register: info@GBLand.org.  Your hosts will include Christine Ward (GBLC), Dennis Regan (HVA) and Adam Brown (ATC).

————

10 to 11:30 am–Water Cycle Activity for Families– / all welcome/ no registration necessary

Come have some fun with this family water-cycle activity called “The Incredible Journey”. Children will become a drop of water and travel along the River Walk to different stations, creating a bracelet that will tell the story of their journey.

————

10:30 a.m.–Stories of Work and Life on the East Bank of the Housatonic River–pre-registration appreciated.

Join Bernie Drew for a trip into history. We will learn about the first Bridge Street bridge, the old Log Homes property, 19th century land development, the rubberwear factory across from St. Peter’s Center and particularly the home of Jason and Almira Cooley, whose house is still there. The Cooley’s had more than one restaurant in town. Jason sometimes went down the hill and paddled a small boat across the river to the other shore to go to work. The journey begins at the Du Bois River Garden Park on River Walk and takes us across the river, then north on East Street, west on Cottage Street and south on Main Street. We will travel back to our starting place along River Walk. Register: info@GBLand.org

Potluck picnic at 12:30.

======

Sponsored by Great Barrington Land Conservancy with Berkshire Natural Resources Council, Greenagers, Housatonic Valley Association, Appalachian Trail Conservancy and the GB Historic Society.

Jun
10
Sat
Becket, MA–Jacob’s Pillow COMMUNITY DAY @ Jacob's Pillow
Jun 10 @ 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm

A special pre-Festival event featuring performances by Berkshire County dance groups, classes, activities, and more. | FREE

A special pre-Festival event featuring performances by Berkshire County dance groups, classes, activities, and more.

Berkshire Pulse dancers perform at 12:40

Jun
17
Sat
Monterey, MA–Archaeology on Bidwell Grounds @ the Bidwell House Museum
Jun 17 @ 10:00 am

What treasures lie outside the Reverend’s door? Professor Eric Johnson, Director of Archaeological Services at UMass, Amherst, discusses the archaeological investigation at the 1760s homestead. How this work is done, examples from other 18th-century homes, and what he found at the museum.

Members: $10. Non-members: $15

413-528-6888
email: bidwellhouse@gmail.com
www.bidwellhousemuseum.org

A Colonial History Museum
National Register of Historic Places
An authentic experience in lifeways of the Berkshires in the 1750s

North Canaan, CT–Beckley Iron Furnace Tours @ Beckley Iron Furnace
Jun 17 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

The grounds are open year round during daylight hours, and we have knowledgeable guides on site offering  tours on Saturdays from 10 AM – 2 PM

 

Blackberry River Walk & Beckley FurnaceBeckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

 

Jun
24
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument Tours @ Beckley Furnace
Jun 24 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

North Canaan, CT–Beckley Iron Furnace Tours @ Beckley Iron Furnace
Jun 24 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

The grounds are open year round during daylight hours, and we have knowledgeable guides on site offering  tours on Saturdays from 10 AM – 2 PM

 

Blackberry River Walk & Beckley FurnaceBeckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

 

Jun
30
Fri
Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Jun 30 @ 7:30 pm

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Jul
1
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument Tours @ Beckley Furnace
Jul 1 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

North Canaan, CT–Beckley Iron Furnace Tours @ Beckley Iron Furnace
Jul 1 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

The grounds are open year round during daylight hours, and we have knowledgeable guides on site offering  tours on Saturdays from 10 AM – 2 PM

 

Blackberry River Walk & Beckley FurnaceBeckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

 

Jul
6
Thu
Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Jul 6 @ 7:30 pm

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Jul
8
Sat
North Canaan, CT–Beckley Iron Furnace Tours @ Beckley Iron Furnace
Jul 8 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

The grounds are open year round during daylight hours, and we have knowledgeable guides on site offering  tours on Saturdays from 10 AM – 2 PM

 

Blackberry River Walk & Beckley FurnaceBeckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

 

Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Jul 8 @ 10:30 am

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Jul
13
Thu
Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Jul 13 @ 7:30 pm

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Jul
15
Sat
North Canaan, CT–Beckley Iron Furnace Tours @ Beckley Iron Furnace
Jul 15 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

The grounds are open year round during daylight hours, and we have knowledgeable guides on site offering  tours on Saturdays from 10 AM – 2 PM

 

Blackberry River Walk & Beckley FurnaceBeckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

 

Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Jul 15 @ 10:30 am

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Jul
20
Thu
Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Jul 20 @ 7:30 pm

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Jul
22
Sat
North Canaan, CT–Beckley Iron Furnace Tours @ Beckley Iron Furnace
Jul 22 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

The grounds are open year round during daylight hours, and we have knowledgeable guides on site offering  tours on Saturdays from 10 AM – 2 PM

 

Blackberry River Walk & Beckley FurnaceBeckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

 

Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Jul 22 @ 10:30 am

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Lenox, MA–Boston Symphony Family Concert @ Tanglewood
Jul 22 @ 1:30 pm

The BSO’s Tanglewood Family Concert provides an engaging chamber concert experience especially for children ages 3–8 and their families. Pre-concert activities begin at 11:30am. This year’s concert features a brass quintet comprised of BSO musicians.

Jul
27
Thu
Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Jul 27 @ 7:30 pm

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Jul
29
Sat
North Canaan, CT–Beckley Iron Furnace Tours @ Beckley Iron Furnace
Jul 29 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

The grounds are open year round during daylight hours, and we have knowledgeable guides on site offering  tours on Saturdays from 10 AM – 2 PM

 

Blackberry River Walk & Beckley FurnaceBeckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

 

Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Jul 29 @ 10:30 am

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Aug
1
Tue
Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Aug 1 @ 7:30 pm

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Aug
4
Fri
Norfolk, CT–“A Weekend in Norfolk”
Aug 4 all-day
Aug
5
Sat
Norfolk, CT–“A Weekend in Norfolk”
Aug 5 all-day
East Canaan, CT–Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument Tours @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 5 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

North Canaan, CT–Beckley Iron Furnace Tours @ Beckley Iron Furnace
Aug 5 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

The grounds are open year round during daylight hours, and we have knowledgeable guides on site offering  tours on Saturdays from 10 AM – 2 PM

 

Blackberry River Walk & Beckley FurnaceBeckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

 

Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Aug 5 @ 10:30 am

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Aug
6
Sun
Norfolk, CT–“A Weekend in Norfolk”
Aug 6 all-day
Aug
8
Tue
Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Aug 8 @ 7:30 pm

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Aug
10
Thu
Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Aug 10 @ 7:30 pm

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Aug
12
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument Tours @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 12 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

North Canaan, CT–Beckley Iron Furnace Tours @ Beckley Iron Furnace
Aug 12 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

The grounds are open year round during daylight hours, and we have knowledgeable guides on site offering  tours on Saturdays from 10 AM – 2 PM

 

Blackberry River Walk & Beckley FurnaceBeckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

 

Norfolk, CT–Emerging Artists Showcase @ Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate
Aug 12 @ 10:30 am

Music in Norfolk has a long and vibrant history, dating back Catch a rising star as the Festival presents its Emerging Artists Showcase — performances by summer Fellows of the Yale School of Music attending Norfolk’s New Music Workshop and Chamber Music Session. These casual concerts are in the Music Shed and are free of charge.

Throughout the years Norfolk audiences have heard hundreds of emerging artists who have gone on to successful professional careers. Norfolk alumni perform with the most illustrious musical organizations in the world: the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Saint Lawrence, Calder, Muir, Miró, Ying, Brentano, Shanghai, Maia and Jasper String Quartets; the Claremont and Eroica Trios; and new music ensembles such as eighth blackbird and SŌ PERCUSSION. Syoko Aki, Claude Frank, Pamela Frank, Frederica von Stade and Richard Stoltzman are all former students of Norfolk.

Under the direction of composer Martin Bresnick, Norfolk’s acclaimed New Music Workshop invites composers and instrumentalists to study the dynamics of taking a piece from a composer’s imagination to the performance hall. The Workshop culminates in a performance featuring world premieres performed by the Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble led by conductor Julian Pellicano.to the 1890s when Ellen Battell and her husband Carl Stoeckel, son of the Yale School of Music’s first professor, founded the Litchfield County Choral Union.  Upon her death in 1939, Ellen Battell Stoeckel left her estate in a private trust with instructions that the facilities be used for Yale University’s summer music school, ensuring an enduring artistic legacy. The Yale Summer School of Music – Norfolk Chamber Music Festival has a dual teaching/performance purpose. Audiences from around the country come to northwest Connecticut to hear world-class artists.

Over the years, while Norfolk has become a symbol of quality in chamber music performance and professional study, thousands have enjoyed the picturesque environment of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate and the excellence of one of America’s most distinguished musical traditions.

Aug
19
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument Tours @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 19 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

North Canaan, CT–Beckley Iron Furnace Tours @ Beckley Iron Furnace
Aug 19 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

The grounds are open year round during daylight hours, and we have knowledgeable guides on site offering  tours on Saturdays from 10 AM – 2 PM

 

Blackberry River Walk & Beckley FurnaceBeckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

 

Aug
26
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument Tours @ Beckley Furnace
Aug 26 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

North Canaan, CT–Beckley Iron Furnace Tours @ Beckley Iron Furnace
Aug 26 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

The grounds are open year round during daylight hours, and we have knowledgeable guides on site offering  tours on Saturdays from 10 AM – 2 PM

 

Blackberry River Walk & Beckley FurnaceBeckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

 

Sep
2
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument Tours @ Beckley Furnace
Sep 2 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.

North Canaan, CT–Beckley Iron Furnace Tours @ Beckley Iron Furnace
Sep 2 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

The grounds are open year round during daylight hours, and we have knowledgeable guides on site offering  tours on Saturdays from 10 AM – 2 PM

 

Blackberry River Walk & Beckley FurnaceBeckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

 

Sep
22
Fri
Kent, CT–2017 Fall Festival @ The Connecticut Antique Machinery Association
Sep 22 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

 

 

ADMISSION FEES: $10 for adults/teens, $5 children age 6-12, free for children age 5 or less. Free for CAMA members.

Our restored drag saw will be demonstrated, as well as our American #1 sawmill. Both have plenty of logs to be cut. There will be demonstrations throughout the weekend of the sawmill, as well as our other wood handling machinery including an antique planer and a splitter. All this in our consolidated wood handling area at the north end of the exhibit field.

Skip Kern, our lead man in the Blacksmith Shop, plans a full weekend of demonstrations along with a number of other area blacksmiths setting up shop in and near ours.

There has been much cosmetic improvement in our Industrial Hall of Steam. Come see the improved appearance and stay for the live demonstrations of our various antique steam engines. We will be running the Nagle-Corliss engine that saw its operational debut at our 2015 show.

Take a ride on Hawaii Railway #5, a restored 1925 Baldwin narrow gauge locomotive. As always, the ride is free and as always the running of #5 is subject to weather and the will of the machinery gods.

See the progress in the latest addition to the CT Museum of Mining and Mineral Science. John Pawloski and a dedicated team have been hard at work preparing special new exhibits for this substantial addition.

Besides all of CAMA’s permanent exhibits, the grounds will be filled with vendors and outside exhibitors that have brought items to be sold, or shown off.

Sep
23
Sat
Kent, CT–2017 Fall Festival @ The Connecticut Antique Machinery Association
Sep 23 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

 

 

ADMISSION FEES: $10 for adults/teens, $5 children age 6-12, free for children age 5 or less. Free for CAMA members.

Our restored drag saw will be demonstrated, as well as our American #1 sawmill. Both have plenty of logs to be cut. There will be demonstrations throughout the weekend of the sawmill, as well as our other wood handling machinery including an antique planer and a splitter. All this in our consolidated wood handling area at the north end of the exhibit field.

Skip Kern, our lead man in the Blacksmith Shop, plans a full weekend of demonstrations along with a number of other area blacksmiths setting up shop in and near ours.

There has been much cosmetic improvement in our Industrial Hall of Steam. Come see the improved appearance and stay for the live demonstrations of our various antique steam engines. We will be running the Nagle-Corliss engine that saw its operational debut at our 2015 show.

Take a ride on Hawaii Railway #5, a restored 1925 Baldwin narrow gauge locomotive. As always, the ride is free and as always the running of #5 is subject to weather and the will of the machinery gods.

See the progress in the latest addition to the CT Museum of Mining and Mineral Science. John Pawloski and a dedicated team have been hard at work preparing special new exhibits for this substantial addition.

Besides all of CAMA’s permanent exhibits, the grounds will be filled with vendors and outside exhibitors that have brought items to be sold, or shown off.

Sep
24
Sun
Kent, CT–2017 Fall Festival @ The Connecticut Antique Machinery Association
Sep 24 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

 

 

ADMISSION FEES: $10 for adults/teens, $5 children age 6-12, free for children age 5 or less. Free for CAMA members.

Our restored drag saw will be demonstrated, as well as our American #1 sawmill. Both have plenty of logs to be cut. There will be demonstrations throughout the weekend of the sawmill, as well as our other wood handling machinery including an antique planer and a splitter. All this in our consolidated wood handling area at the north end of the exhibit field.

Skip Kern, our lead man in the Blacksmith Shop, plans a full weekend of demonstrations along with a number of other area blacksmiths setting up shop in and near ours.

There has been much cosmetic improvement in our Industrial Hall of Steam. Come see the improved appearance and stay for the live demonstrations of our various antique steam engines. We will be running the Nagle-Corliss engine that saw its operational debut at our 2015 show.

Take a ride on Hawaii Railway #5, a restored 1925 Baldwin narrow gauge locomotive. As always, the ride is free and as always the running of #5 is subject to weather and the will of the machinery gods.

See the progress in the latest addition to the CT Museum of Mining and Mineral Science. John Pawloski and a dedicated team have been hard at work preparing special new exhibits for this substantial addition.

Besides all of CAMA’s permanent exhibits, the grounds will be filled with vendors and outside exhibitors that have brought items to be sold, or shown off.

Oct
7
Sat
East Canaan, CT–Beckley Furnace Industrial Monument Tours @ Beckley Furnace
Oct 7 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Beckley Furnace, Connecticut’s only designated Industrial Monument, is the centerpiece of the Upper Housatonic Valley’s Iron Heritage Trail.

Beckley Furnace was built in 1847 by John Adam Beckley, great-grandson of Esquire Samuel Forbes and grandson of John Adam, Jr., the founders of the Forbes & Adam Iron Company.  It was acquired by the Barnum & Richardson Company in 1858.

Beckley Furnace (also known as “East Canaan #2” during the Barnum and Richardson years) produced pig iron until the winter of 1918-19.

Constructed of locally quarried marble, the furnace was originally thirty-two feet in height and thirty feet square at the base.  Later, after it was acquired by the Barnum Richardson Company, the height was raised to forty feet making it one of the largest of forty-three blast furnaces in the Salisbury Iron District.

In the winter of 1919, with World War I over, the Beckley Furnace was finally closed.  However, nearby East Canaan #3 (the so-called “Furnace in a Field”) did not go out of blast until 1923.  A fourth blast furnace, East Canaan #4, was still under construction at the time, was never in blast, and no trace remains of it today.

After the closing of the Beckley Furnace, the buildings and stack slowly deteriorated.  During World War II the site was extensively scavenged for scrap metal for the war effort, and even for bricks.

Then, in 1946, Civil Engineer Charles Rufus Harte recognized the historic importance of Beckley Furnace, and developed a plan for state purchase and preservation of Beckley.  In the process the Beckley Furnace was designated as Connecticut’s sole official state Industrial Monument and in 1978 Beckley was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the fifty years following the State’s purchase of the historic Beckley property, little had been done to maintain the furnace.  With no roof, rain and snow seeped into the furnace.  Continuous freezing and thawing during this period gradually resulted in the formation of structural bulges on all four sides of the stack.

Then, in 1996, with enthusiastic support from local legislators, a group of area citizens succeeded in obtaining $250,000 from the State Bonding Commission.  As a result an archaeological assessment was prepared and the Beckley Furnace was preserved.  Today, that group of area citizens group has evolved into the Friends of Beckley Furnace.